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Car Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common car problems based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

A no crank or no start condition may develop due to electronic lockup of the wireless control module (WCM), also referred to as the Sentry Key Remote Entry Module (SKREEM). When this module fails the remote keyless entry system will also not operate. The WCM is commonly replaced to correct this concern.

The remote keyless entry system may not function intermittently. Our technicians tell us revised software for the wireless ignition node is available which can correct this concern.

A Check Engine Light may illuminate indicating a "Cylinder #3 Misfire." This normally occurs in hot weather after the vehicle has been driven, parked for ten to twenty minutes, and then restarted. Heat from the exhaust vaporizes fuel inside the #3 fuel injector and causes the misfire. Installing an insulator sleeve normally lowers the temperature enough so the fuel will not vaporize.

Owners have reported a number of prematurely worn rear wheel bearings. As the bearing fails, a rotational humming or grinding noise may be noted from the rear as vehicle speed increases. Replacement of the rear hub assembly, which includes the bearing, would be necessary to remedy this condition.

Water leaks from the headliner may be cause by damaged sun roof drain tubes.

If the engine does not crank (or cranks but won't start), the wireless control module (WCM) may have locked up. This is due to static discharge through the ignition key. A revised model should be installed, but simply disconnecting the negative terminal of the battery for thirty seconds will temporarily reset the module so you can start the car.

While driving the 2011-2013 Volvo C70, operators may notice harsh shifting or slippage of the transmission.

This is caused by software issues in many cases, however, internal transmission failure may be the culprit as well.

In some instances, the failure has been attributed to the ‘sealed-for-life’ nature of the transmission, as the transmission fluid may break down before the transmission is taken out of service.

The manufacturer of the transmission, which is a third party, has issued many software updates, but when these updates fail to correct concerns, the transmission must be removed, disassembled, inspected, and repaired. 

 

The CD player in the radio may fail. Our technicians tell us that the radio will need to be removed and sent out to a radio repair shop to correct this condition.

Some models have shift quality problems when shifting into third gear. A new "third gear set" from Honda will address this issue.

Models with electric sliding doors can develop problems with the door mechanism. The cable in the door becomes frayed, which will damage the electric motor.

The Jaguar X-Type produced between 2007-2009 is known to have issues with hard shifts and transmission slippage on models equipped with the six speed automatic transmission. When the transmission gets warm, the issues is most noticeable as a hesitation to shift, followed by jerking or jolting into the next gear.

The hard shifting and transmission slipping is commonly a result of software inadequacies, which do not account for all variables as the transmission heats to normal operating conditions. In some cases, the automatic transmission may be suffering from a damaged valve body or faulty shift solenoids.

 

Software updates from the manufacturer of this transmission have solved many reported complaints, but not all. In cases where software updates to the transmission controller have failed, the transmission will likely need valve body replacement, shift solenoid testing and replacement, or even a complete rebuild.

Since the transmission is sealed for life, the fluid is not normally considered a suspected cause, but many technicians recommend changing the transmission specific automatic transmission fluid at normal intervals. 

One or more fuel injectors may become stuck closed causing an engine misfire  and the Check Engine Light to illuminate. Our technicians tell us that this problem can be caused by some fuel additives. There are special procedures which may be able to restore the affected injector. If this fails the affected injector must be replaced.

Check Engine Light illumination—combined with a lack of power or a stumble on acceleration—may be caused by the throttle position switch (TPS). Kia released an improved part which should correct this concern.

The AC compressor may seize resulting in loss of cold air from the AC vents. Often when the compressor fails in the fashion, debris is spread through out the entire air conditioning system resulting in very expensive repairs.

The AC may not blow cold air due to a failed pressure switch. A failed switch will require replacement to restore proper AC operation.

The 1990-2005 Honda Civic commonly have issues with radiator leaks due to normal operation. The leak usually starts small with the engine running slightly warmer than normal, but may/will eventually cause:

  • Coolant puddling under vehicle
  • Engine overheating
  • Unexplained coolant loss (only at first)
  • Vehicle in “limp mode”; loss of power
  • Cylinder head or head gasket failure
  • The coolant leaking can have a severe effect on your vehicle if left in disrepair. If the radiator is diagnosed as the leaky part, it will need to be replaced, or resealed if that is an option.

    Note: coolant is toxic to animals, but tastes sweet. Any coolant spills should be cleaned to protect animals and children.

    The engine may stall at times due to a failed crankshaft position sensor and/or camshaft position sensor, These sensors can fail intermittently as they warm with the engine. Sensors on certain models have been recalled by Nissan and will be replaced as necessary. Please visit our recall section for this model to see if your vehicle is covered by this recall.

    The evaporator temperature sensor can fail, causing the AC compressor not to cycle. If the AC compressor does not turn on, the AC system will not blow cold air. If the compressor is stuck on, the air will be very cold at first, before warming up.

    An abnormal noise and/or vibration may be noted from the front brakes during light braking. Our technicians tell us it may be necessary to replace the steering knuckle and hub assembly, along with resurfacing the rotors to correct this concern.

    The fuel gauge may read incorrectly due to a faulty sender in the tank. A failed fuel level sender will require replacement to restore correct fuel gauge operation.

    The daytime running lights are prone to burning out. Our technicians tell us that the light sockets may show signs of heat damage but usually are OK. Always be sure to use the correct replacement bulb for the best life expectancy. The new bulb recommendation for 2000-2003 models is #4114K (trade number).

    The Check Engine Light may illuminate because of oxygen sensor failure. There may be no drivability symptoms detected though gas mileage may suffer.

     

    The digital display portion of the instrument cluster may fail. Our technicians tell us the entire instrument cluster will need to be replaced to correct this concern.

    The anti-lock brake system (ABS) and/or traction control light may illuminate. This can be caused by corrosion in the (ABS) wire harness connector at the right front wheel speed sensor due to water intrusion.  Corroded connectors should be cleaned or replaced as necessary to correct this concern.

    The clutch in the torque converter can fail, allowing debris to circulate throughout the automatic transmission.