Close
Why is my 2002 ford explorer overheating
2002 Ford Explorer

Why is my 2002 ford explorer overheating

(2002 Ford Explorer)
I've replaced the water pump, reservoir cap, thermostat, thermostat housing, radiator, and bypassed the heater core since Ford decided to run heater lines to the rear roof for climate control. Not loosing coolant so I dont think its head gasket, also not seeing oil/coolant mix. Where else would I have to diagnose?
What seems to make the problem better or worse? Bleeding the pressure off
How long have you had this problem? Couple weeks since I bought it
Tags: ford, explorer
1 answer & 8 comments
Popular Answer
on August 05, 2019

Need to know under WHAT conditions overheating occurs - stopped with engine on - stop and go traffic - at highway speeds.......?
Sign in to reply
on August 05, 2019
It doesn't always overheat while idling or in traffic. Haven't taken it out on the road yet till I know it can cool itself 100% of the time. It's not a consistent symptom to pinpoint.
on August 05, 2019

Mysterious overheating is often the result of ‘combustion’ entering the cooling system - there is a specific test for that.

It is not unusual for NO coolant mixed with engine oil in the presence of a failed cylinder head gasket.

It is also possible there is air still trapped in the system..

This is assuming the engine is actually over-heating and not an erroneous temperature gauge reading.

Lastly - a circulation problem typically results in NO heater output - no HOT air - - again assuming you did not bypass the FRONT havc system.. (?)

Good luck?
on August 05, 2019
One last question, if it is a failed head gasket, would the symptom be present on every startup? Or not until the load was too great for it to contain pressure intermittently? I just tired to diagnose again and built pressure in the reservoir but the top radiator line was cool to the touch. And reservoir was full of fluid. Does this mean I have a failed radiator? Or air locked somewhere?
on August 05, 2019

There is no common protocol for symptoms of a failed cylinder head gasket - there are many variations..

A combustion lest ‘test’ is invaluable.
on August 05, 2019
Edit to previous reply...sorry
on August 05, 2019
Coolant flows from bottom of engine to the top of engine - the THERMOSTAT is what’s responsible for controlling the flow rate.. However any restrictive problem would have the same effect > a cool ‘upper’ radiator hose - - this includes of course an “air lock” or combustion leakage - even a defective thermostat..

IF possible - some background / history about the vehicle may shed some light on this issue.. Perhaps the previous owner would help out there.
on August 05, 2019
Thanks for the support. I'll keep plugging away at it and keep y'all updated.
on August 05, 2019
Coolant Leak Diagnosis
$88 - $111 Learn More
on August 05, 2019

Need to know under WHAT conditions overheating occurs - stopped with engine on - stop and go traffic - at highway speeds.......?
Sign in to reply
on August 05, 2019
It doesn't always overheat while idling or in traffic. Haven't taken it out on the road yet till I know it can cool itself 100% of the time. It's not a consistent symptom to pinpoint.
on August 05, 2019

Mysterious overheating is often the result of ‘combustion’ entering the cooling system - there is a specific test for that.

It is not unusual for NO coolant mixed with engine oil in the presence of a failed cylinder head gasket.

It is also possible there is air still trapped in the system..

This is assuming the engine is actually over-heating and not an erroneous temperature gauge reading.

Lastly - a circulation problem typically results in NO heater output - no HOT air - - again assuming you did not bypass the FRONT havc system.. (?)

Good luck?
on August 05, 2019
One last question, if it is a failed head gasket, would the symptom be present on every startup? Or not until the load was too great for it to contain pressure intermittently? I just tired to diagnose again and built pressure in the reservoir but the top radiator line was cool to the touch. And reservoir was full of fluid. Does this mean I have a failed radiator? Or air locked somewhere?
on August 05, 2019

There is no common protocol for symptoms of a failed cylinder head gasket - there are many variations..

A combustion lest ‘test’ is invaluable.
on August 05, 2019
Edit to previous reply...sorry
on August 05, 2019
Coolant flows from bottom of engine to the top of engine - the THERMOSTAT is what’s responsible for controlling the flow rate.. However any restrictive problem would have the same effect > a cool ‘upper’ radiator hose - - this includes of course an “air lock” or combustion leakage - even a defective thermostat..

IF possible - some background / history about the vehicle may shed some light on this issue.. Perhaps the previous owner would help out there.
on August 05, 2019
Thanks for the support. I'll keep plugging away at it and keep y'all updated.
on August 05, 2019

Similar Questions

View answers to similar questions from RepairPal's community of auto experts and enthusiasts.
I just got a 91 ford explorer. and it was slipping so i checked the fluid and it was a low so i toped it off. and now...
I recently brought my 1997 ford explorer limited awd to a service shop with front end grinding noise. almost sounded...