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The Most Reliable (and Unreliable) Cars of 2010

October 27, 2010

Consumer Reports just published its 2010 Annual Auto Survey, which rates the reliability of foreign and domestic vehicles based on subscribers' experiences. While Toyota and Honda still dominate the list, some U.S. brands have made great strides in their reliability ratings. Here are some of the findings.

Despite the recall of nearly 10 million vehicles over the past year for such problems as sticking brake pedals, defective electronic control modules, and leaky master cylinders, Toyota still tops the list of most reliable cars. Honda and Acura, which have both suffered many recalls as well, also remained at the top of the list. Other Asian models—the Subaru, Hyundai, Kia, and Nissan—rated high in the report, but did not show big improvement over the previous year.

The good news is that many American vehicles have shown improvement in reliability—some have even shown great improvement. After having been among the least reliable vehicles for many years, GM’s reliability rating went up by almost 70 percent this year. The Ford Company averaged a 90 percent rating, led by the midsized Ford Fusion, which has shown high reliability since it was introduced in 2005. Ford’s Flex EcoBoost and Lincoln MKT also rated highly in their first year out of the gate.

Europe hit a bit of a bumpy road in this year’s reliability ratings. Five of eleven BMW models scored below average and six of thirteen Mercedes-Benz models were below average as well. Considering what people pay for these vehicles, it’s a rather abysmal showing. And about 75 percent of Audi’s models scored below average, with one model ranked at the very bottom of the list.

The highest rated American automaker was Ford, while the lowest rated American automaker was Chrysler, which was also the lowest-ranked brand in the entire survey. The best predicted reliability overall was the Porsche Boxster, while the Jaguar XF and the Audi A6 3.0T were the two lowest-ranked vehicles in the survey.

To check out the complete report, please click here >>

 

About the Author

Hi, I'm Natalie Josef. I work as an editor and writer for RepairPal. When I first started, I couldn't explain the difference between disc and drum brakes to save my life. Now, I could replace a transmission myself ... well, maybe not replace it, but at least I could tell you where it is. My mission in life is to rid the world of poor grammar and improper uses of punctuation ... a lofty goal, sure, but at least I get paid for my obsession. Besides correcting mistakes and trying to explain the difference between en and em dashes to the guys, I work as a soccer referee and enjoy heavy metal and classical music, English football (Go Tottenham!), and my cats.

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