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RepairPal Blog:

 General Interest

Gas prices? The future of hybrids? Find out what's in the news today!

We spend a lot of time in our cars. When customers bring in their cars for service, they always want to know how long we need to repair it because they need it back. In the U.S., 92 percent of us say we just don’t want our cars … we need our cars!

I rejoined the Denver Roadster Club and needed an open car. We found a 1925 Dodge touring car in northern Colorado that is very complete and solid. I have always liked something out of the ordinary and this fits the bill.

On my way to work today, I had a warning light go off in my Audi A3 that I had never noticed before. Apparently my daytime running right side light had gone out. The funny thing is, I didn’t even realize I had daytime running lights. I also noticed that I have fog lights, but in my ten years of driving, I don’t think I’ve ever used them. 

I was looking for a "retirement project" and since over the years I had collected many additional parts from other '39 Dodges, I had fenders and lots more to start something else. I had always longed to have another open car (I had a '30 Ford touring car and a "T" bucket and sold them) and I wanted to cut the top off a car and make a big convertible.

In 1965, I went to Oregon with the Coast Guard and ended up in a small town, Depoe Bay, which had about 300 residents in the winter. The station was small, so we had to find an apartment in town. We had to be on the boat within three minutes of a boat call (siren), so I needed quick transportation to the station. I decided to buy a car, so I bought the only car for sale in town—a 1939 Dodge Coupe for $65!

In December 2011, my partner, Sarah, and I went up to her father's place in Denver. Besides seeing snow for the first time in over a decade, I was also excited to see his garage where he works on classic cars. I had seen a few pictures Sarah had taken before, but I wanted to see it with my own eyes.

I was driving on the entrance ramp to a highway yesterday when a huge crater suddenly presented itself before me. I was going about 55mph and the double lane was tapering into a single lane, so there was nothing I could do to avoid it. I braced myself and cringed when I went over the pothole, certain it would rip the entire suspension from my vehicle. It didn’t, but it sure sounded and felt like it.

We hear about recalls all of the time, but have you ever heard of a Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) or a campaign? How do they differ from recalls? If a recall or TSB is issued for your car, do you have to pay for the repairs? 

I recently came across a very interesting article that stated that California is preparing a campaign to encourage motorists to wait longer than the “recommended 3000 mile” oil change. If you recall the other week, one our fellow bloggers discussed this very topic.

In August 2010, in Missouri, a nineteen-year-old pickup truck driver traveling at 55mph crashed into the back of a tractor truck, which caused a deadly chain reaction. After striking the tractor truck, the pickup truck was then rear-ended by a school bus, which was then rear-ended by another school bus. Among the casualties were the pickup driver and a fifteen-year-old student. Another thirty-eight people were injured.