Ford Mustang GT Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Ford Mustang GT as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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11
Known Problems

The 2010-2014 Ford Mustang GT with automatic climate control may have a problem with frequent fan speed changes when using the heater or air conditioner. This includes all performance models including the GT500, BOSS 302, GT, GT350, GT-H, and CA Special Ed.

Normally, the fan speed changes only to maintain a selected temperature, but when the fan speed changes frequently and needlessly, there is an issue with the fan speed control unit. 

The fan speed control unit, sometimes erroneously called the blower motor resister, regulates the speed for the blower motor in order to maintain the temperature set by the driver. When it fails, the fan will run at random settings, and the climate control will be inaccurate.

Note: this does not affect the temperature of the air that comes from the vents, it affects the amount of air that comes from the vents. 

The repair is simple, and quick. The control unit is located behind the glove box in most models, and removal and installation takes only minutes.

Also note: this only applies to vehicles with single or dual automatic climate control.

The 2005-2009 Ford Mustang GT with manual temperature and fan controls may have problems with the the blower motor only blowing air on certain settings. This affects the Mustang Bullitt, Shelby Mustang GT350 and Shelby Mustang GT500 as well. 

Most commonly the fan will only run on the highest setting. This is a well documented problem, and is caused by a failing blower motor resistor.

Correcting the problem is straight forward, and requires replacement of the small resistor. The resistor is normally found behind the glove box, next to the blower motor.

If a squeaking noise is heard while turning the steering wheel, the outer tie rod ends may be worn and should be replaced.

Our technicians tell us the spark plugs in this engine can be very difficult to remove. Ford has issued a service bulletin (08-7-6) to address this issue, which includes a recommended procedure on how to remove the plugs. Failure to follow the recommended procedure can result in the one or more spark plugs breaking off in the cylinder head.

The recommend procedure is as follows. Using this procedure will greatly reduce the chance of breaking a spark plug.

1. Break the spark plugs loose when the engine is warm.
2. Turn each plug 1/8 to 1/4 turn and soak the treads with 1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon of Motorcraft Carburetor Tune-Up Cleaner or a quality penetrating oil. Do not try to remove the plugs at this time.
3. Let the threads soak for at least 15 minutes.
4. After the soak period, tighten and loosen each spark plug, working it back and forth until the turning effort is reduced. Then, you can remove the spark plug.

There are special tools available to remove the broken spark plugs and repair shops will often charge additional labor time, over and above the quoted spark plug replacement cost, for the removal of each broken spark plug.

4.0L V6 engines may develop a buzzing type noise from the upper engine area at about 1900 RPM, under light acceleration. Our technicians tell us this can be caused by loose ignition coil bracket bolts. Coil bracket bolts should be checked for the correct torque before further diagnoses is performed.

If a droning noise is coming from the fuel tank, it may be caused by a noisy fuel pump check valve. A fuel pump assembly, with a revised unit, is available address this concern.

If a buzzing noise is coming from the exhaust at different engine speeds and conditions, this is commonly caused by the heat shields on catalytic converters coming loose at points. The buzzing is the metal on metal contact. Installing a large worm clamp around the catalytic converter and heat shield assembly will prevent the noise and secure the shields.

Internal heater blower motor issues can cause a ticking noise from the heater blower when the fan is on. To correct this concern, replace the heater blower motor with a revised unit.

An internal transmission issue can cause a longer than normal shift from first to second gear, and it can feel harsh. Premature wear of the accumulator seal from scuffing of the accumulator case bore is the cause, and replacing the 1-2 accumulator spring, seal, and piston will correct this concern.

A broken retaining bracket for parking brake cable can cause a scraping noise on hard acceleration from the driveline area. Replacing the retainer bracket and securing it should fix this problem.