Car Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

Screws inside the intake manifold can become loose causing internal engine damage if they fall out completely. Our technicians report that using a strong thread locker on the power valve butterfly screws can help prevent them from becoming loose.

Wind noise and/or squeaks and rattles may be noted from the removable roof, water leaks are also common. Our technicians tell us there is no real fix for these issues.

If the engine cranks but does not start, or starts and stalls, the fuses should be inspected, especially the power door locks fuse. The power door lock fuse provides power to a module that sends the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) the "OK to start" signal.

Software enhancements are available to remedy inconsistency and confusion about the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) cleaning cycle - “Regeneration” mode. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) will need to be reprogrammed to add several enhancements, including a more reasonable driving experience during the cleaning cycle and instrument cluster notifications of the cleaning status.

Sensor failure inside the distributor can cause intermittent stalling or a failure to start. In addition, the wires to the distributor are susceptible to internal damage, which can cause the same symptoms.

Shifting harshness and shuddering issues related to the operation of the automatic transmission have been addressed by factory service bulletins. The shuddering can feel like the vehicle is being driven over rumble strips.

The upper dash may crack, most commonly on vehicles in warm climates and exposed to a lot of sunlight. The common repair is to replace the upper instrument trim panel. Information on a technical service bulletin or extended warranty is not available at this time.

As the size of the Camry vehicle gets ever larger, there is a tendency to warp the front rotors. This will be felt as a shudder in the steering wheel when braking. The front rotors can be remachined, if there is sufficient material left, otherwise the front rotors will need to be replaced. It is recommended to use factory quality rotors because cheap quality rotors warp very easily and tend to squeak and squeal.

The power door lock actuators may become slow to operate or stop working completely and require replacement.

A rattle-type noise may be noted on cold start-up due to a failing timing chain tensioner. Chevrolet revised the design of the tensioner multiple times over the production of the Cobalt, replacement is necessary to remedy this condition. A failed chain tensioner may result in a broken timing chain and subsequent engine damage if the issue is not diagnosed and repaired.

The spark plugs should be replaced every 100,000 miles. Our technicians recommend replacing the spark plug wires also at this time.

The camshaft driven distributor can leak oil and cause a malfunction of the crankshaft position sensor. The engine may crank but not start or run very poorly.

The power steering reservoir designed for the 2006-2014 Mercedes Benz ML350 commonly leaks power steering fluid causing a screeching sound when turning the steering wheel, especially when the vehicle is stopped. The power steering light may illuminate on the dash for more severe leaks.

This is caused by cracking in the plastic reservoir, or a hardened, brittle seal between the power steering reservoir and power steering pump.

Remediation involves replacing the power steering fluid reservoir, power steering fluid, bleeding the system of air, and replacement of the seal between the reservoir and power steering pump.

The composite (plastic) intake manifold may crack near the thermostat housing and cause a coolant leak. Ford released an updated manifold that was reinforced to prevent a recurrence. No recall was issued for this problem but Ford did extend the warranty to seven years on some models from the date of purchase.

The 4WD transfer case encoder motor position sensor or the selector switch may fail causing the service 4WD message to be displayed. Fault code(s) stored in the transfer case control module will be of assistance in determining the exact fault causing the message to be displayed.

Vehicles equipped with a 7-speed automatic transmission may develop a rough shifting condition, most commonly going up from first to second gear and going down from third to second or second to first gear. Our technicians tell us this is due to an internal component failure. Mercedes has released updated parts; the transmission will need to be removed and disassembled to complete the necessary repairs.

On some models sticking rocker pins in the valve train can cause a loud engine noise, and the Check Engine light (MIL) to come on. Replacing the rocker assemblies is required to repair  this problem.

The windshield wipers may not work intermittently due to a faulty wiper motor control board. Our technicians tell us that lightly taping on the wiper motor when the fault occurs should temporarily get the wipers working again. Some vehicles were recalled for this problem and some were not. You will need to check with your local dealer to find out if a specific vehicle was included.

There have been problems with the climate control system not working at times. Volvo has made a Software upgrade for the AC control module is available that can correct certain climate control system faults.

A coolant leak from the radiator can be caused by a defective thermostat bypass. This can cause pressure spikes in the cooling system, which leads to radiator failure. The thermostat assembly and radiator should be replaced.

Triggered by a short in the rear wiper motor/circuit (which causes a fuse to blow), the airbag warning light can illuminate erroneously.

Models with electric sliding doors can develop problems with the door mechanism. The cable in the door becomes frayed, which will damage the electric motor.

The blend door actuator for the HVAC system may fail causing a continuous loud clicking noise when cycling the recirculation button, or switching from heat to air conditioning. Replacement of the actuator is required to remedy the issue.