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Volvo V70 Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Volvo V70 based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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26
Known Problems

There are several common complaints regarding Volvo V70 transmission shifting issues. Long shift times between gear shifts, hard shifting, hard downshifting and a loss of transmission operation to name a few.

If the issue is minor, a transmission software update may address this. If available, the software should be updated before any repairs are made. After a software update or repair, the shift adaptation needs to be reset. A good quality Volvo repair shop will know how to perform this task.

There are several technical service bulletins (TSB's) available from Volvo that address these shifting issues and they should be consulted by the repair shop during the automatic transmission diagnostic process.

Regular servicing of the transmission fluid can help with preventing transmission failure, but not in all cases. Follow the suggested fluid replacement interval recommended by Volvo. You will find this in your owners manual, or find it here>>

The mass air flow (MAF) sensor may fail, resulting in drivability issues and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light.

The anti-lock brake system (ABS) Control Unit has a high failure rate. When this fault occurs, the ABS light will illuminate and codes may be stored indicating a problem with the ABS Pump Motor, or Wheel Speed Sensors, but the problem is the ABS Control Module.

Other symptoms may include an illuminated Check Engine and transmission shift light, and the speedometer may stop working as well.

Note: The brake system will operate normally however during a panic stop the Anti Lock Brakes will not work and the wheels may lock-up, causing a lack of vehicle control under these situations.

A broken vacuum hose near the power steering pump deteriorates and can cause a rough idle and the Check Engine Light to illuminate

The MAF sensor is prone to failure and will turn on the Check Engine Light when it fails.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate due to an intake manifold gasket vacuum leak.

A well-documented and well-known issue with the Volvo V70 built between 2005-2010 is harsh shifting from the 6-speed automatic transmission, and slight slippage between gears. This has been noted as hesitation to accelerate, especially from a stop.

Mainly, software issues have been to blame for these mishaps, but mechanical malfunctions related to shift solenoids and the valve body have also been major causes. Finally, the automatic transmissions in these models are sold as ‘sealed for life’, yet the transmission fluid does not seem to last the complete service life of the vehicle.

Correction of these issues often requires a simple software update, meaning the vehicle only needs to be plugged in, and the transmission controller receives new programming meant to fix these drivability concerns. In cases where this does not correct concerns, the transmission must be removed, inspected, and repaired, possibly requiring a complete rebuild.

To mitigate these issues from escalating to a full transmission rebuild, many technicians recommend replacing the transmission fluid at regular intervals, yet the manufacturer has never offered this guidance. 

 

One or more door lock assembly may fail and cause door locking/unlocking problems.

The anti-lock brake system (ABS) warning light and/or other dash warning lights may illuminate due to a failed ABS Control Module. Replacement of the failed module is generally required to correct this concern.

The front control arm bushings wear out, resulting in alignment issues and squeaking and/or knocking noises from the front end. Worn bushings will require replacement.

The AC evaporator is prone to leaking, causing the air conditioning system to lose refrigerant and stop blowing cold air.

A refrigerant leak may develop from the AC evaporator causing the AC to blow warm air. Verifying failure of this component is difficult. A good shop will use leak detection dye to verify a failing evaporator.

The secondary air pump may fail causing the check engine light to illuminate. The cause is often a failure of the air pump check valve that contaminates the air pump with exhaust gas/moisture.

When braking at highway speeds or when descending hills, a rumbling or vibration felt throughout the vehicle can be from the rear brake rotors. Replacement of the rear pads and rotors is the fix, and make sure that the shop installs the special cut-out shims available from Volvo to help prevent this in the future.