Close

Ford Crown Victoria Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Ford Crown Victoria based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

No_car_image
Get a Repair Estimate
Guaranteed by certified locations nationwide. Learn more
Get a Repair Estimate For Your Ford Crown Victoria
RepairPal estimates are guaranteed at over 1,700 quality certified locations nationwide. Learn more
22
Known Problems
Wear on the rear axle shafts near the bearings can create excessive play and lead to gear oil leaking past the seals. Gear oil will leak onto the brake backing plate, brakes, and wheels.

The composite (plastic) intake manifold may crack near the thermostat housing and cause a coolant leak. Ford released an updated manifold that was reinforced to prevent a recurrence. No recall was issued for this problem but Ford did extend the warranty to seven years on some models from the date of purchase.

Transmission problems are common in this model, often as a result of a failed front pump. The pump loses its ability to create hydraulic pressure, which an automatic transmission needs to function. A sign of front pump failure can be a whine type noise.

The battery light may illuminate on the instrument panel because the alternator wire harness connector is damaged. A new connector kit is available and should be installed to correct this concern.

If you experience difficulty starting the engine when cold, stalling at idle, or hesitations during acceleration, it may be the idle air bypass valve. This valve helps the vehicle idle steady when the accelerator pedal is not pressed.

The engine may overheat at idle when the AC is on. A new, upgraded fan motor and resistor assembly should be installed.

The throttle position sensor (TPS) may fail. Common symptoms of a defective TPS can be rough idle, hard starting, hesitation on acceleration, poor fuel economy, and stalling.

Catalytic converter failure is common. Internal components become loose, causing a rattle or creating back pressure in the exhaust.

The heater hose outlet may leak coolant at the back of the intake manifold. Sometimes this is misdiagnosed as a leaking intake manifold gasket because it resembles a leaking manifold.

One or more oxygen sensors may fail resulting in illumination of the Check Engine Light.

The EGR valve position (EVP) sensor can fail on this vehicle. The EVP sensor measures the EGR valve position and transmits the date to the engine control computer. If it fails, drivability and fuel economy can suffer, the Check Engine Light will commonly illuminate.

The illumination of the Check Engine Light is common due to ignition misfire, often caused by bad spark plugs or ignition coil.