Car care advice

Misfires and Their Causes

Generally, the term "misfire" refers to an incomplete combustion process inside the cylinder. When this becomes severe enough, the driver will feel a jerking action from the engine and/or powertrain. Often the owner will bring the vehicle into a shop complaining that the timing is "off." This is partially correct because a misfire does involve a mis-timed combustion event. However, the base ignition timing being out of adjustment is only one reason for a misfire to occur—and not the most likely.

Ignition Misfire
An ignition system problem is one of the most common reasons for an engine to misfire. As the spark plugs, ignition cables, distributor cap and rotor, and ignition coil wear over time, their ability to transfer the needed spark to ignite the air/fuel mixture inside the combustion chambers becomes compromised. In the early stages, the spark will only be weaker and the actual misfire will be subtle. As the ignition components continue to wear, the misfire will intensify and the combustion process can be interrupted completely. This will cause a severe jerk or shock in the operation of the engine (the engine may even backfire through the air intake system, producing a loud "pop").

Lean Misfire
The lean misfire is another common reason for an engine "miss"—this is due to an imbalanced air/fuel ratio (too much air/too little fuel). Since an engine needs a richer (more fuel) mixture for a smooth idle, this problem may be more noticeable when the vehicle is idling. The lean misfire may decrease or disappear as the engine speed increases because the efficiency of the volumetric flow into the combustion chambers increases dramatically. This is one reason why a vehicle gets better mileage on the freeway than in the city. An EGR valve that is stuck open, a leaking Intake Manifold Gasket, a defective Mass Air Flow Sensor, a weak or failing fuel pump, or a plugged fuel filter are some of the many causes for a lean misfire.

Mechanical Misfire
Mechanical problems can also cause an engine to misfire. Common causes of a mechanical misfire are worn piston rings, valves, cylinder walls, or lobes on a camshaft; a leaking head gasket or intake manifold gasket; damaged or broken rocker arms; defective fuel injectors (and/or the electronics that control them); and a slipped or incorrectly-installed timing belt or timing chain. Generally, this type of misfire has more of a "thumping" feel to it. It is usually noticeable regardless of engine speed; in fact, it may even intensify as the engine speed increases.

Powertrain Misfire
Sometimes, the engine has nothing to do with a misfire. One common cause for "jerky" performance that feels like a misfire is a problem in the transmission and its ability to properly up- or down-shift. If the misfire occurs during higher speeds, it could be a problem with the operation of the overdrive gear or a chattering clutch in the Lockup Torque Converter. If the vehicle jerks or feels like it is "missing" during deceleration, it could be due to harsh transmission downshifts, badly warped rotors, out of round brake drums, and/or sticking brake pads or brake shoes.

Make sure that you have the vehicle properly inspected in order to determine the root cause of the misfire. Entire engines have been replaced to solve a wrongly perceived mechanical misfire problem that was actually rooted in the transfer case, transmission, driveshaft, or front/rear differential.



Daniel Dillon has twenty-two years of experience as a licensed Smog Technician in California. He helped write test questions for the California Smog Technician Exam and has performed Consumer Assistance Program and gold shield diagnostic work for the state. He was also an instructor for SnapOn Tool Corporation.

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