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2006 Lincoln Zephyr Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 2006 Lincoln Zephyr based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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7
Known Problems

A coolant leak may develop from the heater core. The failure may be due to electrolysis. Our technicians recommend to check for voltage in the coolant with the battery disconnected. If voltage is found the cooling system should be flushed and jumper wires added to engine ground straps as necessary.

The automatic transmission may develop shifting concerns. On lower mileage vehicles, upgrading the software in the powertrain control module (PCM) and the transmission control module (TCM) may correct the problem. As the mileage increases, internal transmission damage can occur. Repairs could involve replacement of the valve body or a complete transmission rebuild. Whenever major transmission repairs are made, it is important to be sure the PCM and the TCM have the latest software updates to help prevent these issues from reoccurring.

A well-documented and well-known issue with the Lincoln Zephyr is harsh shifting from the 6-speed automatic transmission, and slight slippage between gears. This has been noted as hesitation to accelerate, especially from a stop.

Mainly, software issues have been to blame for these mishaps, but mechanical malfunctions related to shift solenoids and the valve body have also been major causes. Finally, the automatic transmissions in these models are sold as ‘sealed for life’, yet the transmission fluid does not seem to last the complete service life of the vehicle.

Correction of these issues often requires a simple software update, meaning the vehicle only needs to be plugged in, and the transmission controller receives new programming meant to fix these drivability concerns. In cases where this does not correct concerns, the transmission must be removed, inspected, and repaired, possibly requiring a complete rebuild.

To mitigate these issues from escalating to a full transmission rebuild, many technicians recommend replacing the transmission fluid at regular intervals, yet the manufacturer has never offered this guidance.

The ignition key may become stuck in the ignition lock, possibly associated with a binding shifter bezel. Our technicians tell us that if the shifter knob is sticking or the shifter bezel is binding the affected part should be replaced.

A squeak or creak noise may be noted when driving over bumps. Our technicians tell us of two possible causes. The lower control arm may have faulty welds or the strut jounce bumper could be rubbing on a dry strut plate. There is a factory repair kit for the lower control arms. If the noise is coming from the strut it may require dis-assembly to lubricate the jounce bumper.

The power steering may leak fluid at the pump, hose, or steering gear. This can be caused by one or more hoses not being clamped tightly enough. The repair involves adding new clamps and seals to the power steering hoses at the pump and steering gear.

The trunk lid may not latch closed, this is generally caused by the trunk latch sticking in the open position. Our technicians tell us that in most cases the trunk latch assembly will need to be replaced to correct this issue.