RepairPal Blog

I recently performed some repairs on my 1994 GMC Sonoma pickup. Along with replacing the fuel injector due to a leak from the fuel pressure regulator, I also replaced the spark plugs, air filter, and fuel filter. Not long after these repairs were completed, I began to notice a slight engine misfire when pulling away from a stop.

Black ice is not really black—it’s a transparent layer of ice that looks black because it’s so thin that you can see the road surface below it. Any ice is dangerous to drive on, but black ice is especially bad because it fools you into thinking the road is only wet, not icy.

We spend a lot of time in our cars. When customers bring in their cars for service, they always want to know how long we need to repair it because they need it back. In the U.S., 92 percent of us say we just don’t want our cars … we need our cars!

I rejoined the Denver Roadster Club and needed an open car. We found a 1925 Dodge touring car in northern Colorado that is very complete and solid. I have always liked something out of the ordinary and this fits the bill.

There is a lot that can go wrong with cars—all of the moving parts, the electronics, the maintenance required to keep you on the road ... The last thing people want to do is spend money on car repair, even if it is sorely needed.

Everyone understands that cars need to get greener. They are already a lot greener than they have been in the past, but more green is on the way. By 2030, all petrol and Diesel cars will be banned from European cities. 

On my way to work today, I had a warning light go off in my Audi A3 that I had never noticed before. Apparently my daytime running right side light had gone out. The funny thing is, I didn’t even realize I had daytime running lights. I also noticed that I have fog lights, but in my ten years of driving, I don’t think I’ve ever used them. 

I was looking for a "retirement project" and since over the years I had collected many additional parts from other '39 Dodges, I had fenders and lots more to start something else. I had always longed to have another open car (I had a '30 Ford touring car and a "T" bucket and sold them) and I wanted to cut the top off a car and make a big convertible.

Picture yourself driving down the road on a dark and stormy night. Suddenly you hear a strange knocking noise that fills you with dread. Could it be … gasp … your car? You ask yourself: What is it? Can I make it to my destination? How much will it cost to fix?

When you put batteries in your TV remote control, they eventually die and you toss them out and replace them. Your cell phone, however, has a rechargeable battery that you plug in to charge. Since most of us do not plug our cars in (yet) and we don’t toss out our car battery on a regular basis, how does the battery charge?