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This is the latest in a series of blog posts that our Honda expert, Robert Isbell, is writing for RepairPal. Robert has worked at Honda dealerships for over 22 years as a technician, shop foreman and service manager. He has developed and led new owner clinics that educate new owners about their cars and he will be contributing to  our blog to educate our visitors about the methods for getting the most out of your service experience. Missed the preceding post? Click here.

We've updated RepairPal!  Our goal is to be your one-stop website for comprehensive auto repair and service information. In our effort to provide accurate repair estimates and lists of common problems for as many cars and drivers as possible, we've just added 6 new models and updated 40+ existing models, including the Honda Accord, Civic, Toyota Camry, Ford F150, Mustang and the Chevrolet Cobalt and Chevrolet Malibu. We are currently processing new data, so we will be adding many more models in the coming weeks, including the Hybrid Versions of the Ford Fusion, Toyota Camry and Highlander, Honda Accord and Civic and the Chevrolet Tahoe! If you don't see your vehicle here, don't hesitate to request that your vehicle be added!

I’ve been driving on a spare ever since I retrieved my stolen van from a dilapidated tow yard months ago. The thieves apparently got a flat, put on the spare in the van, and didn’t have the decency to replace the flattened tire. Though my father taught me how to change a tire, that lesson was fifteen years ago. I did a little research and found five easy steps to get the job done. Just in case you get a flat (or run across some thieves as inconsiderate as mine), here’s what to do.Make sure you have a spare.

Have you ever taken your car in to be serviced only to find yourself walking out with a lighter wallet, wondering if you really needed that rear alignment, coolant flush, and a new power steering pump? While ignoring your mechanic’s advice to replace your paper-thin brake pads probably isn’t wise, there are a few areas where you can save money and gain confidence. Read Your Car’s Manual

I have worked in the California Smog and Emissions Testing program for over 22 years. I have worked in the Gold Shield Program, which helps to certify Gross Polluter vehicles (vehicles that fail their Emissions Inspection by a wide margin) since 1995.  Sometimes the Gold Shield Shops and Technicians that do this work do not get paid for all the time and work they put in when they are bringing an older vehicle, that may have high mileage, back into spec so it can pass an Emissions Test.  That said, there is a feeling of satisfaction in knowing that you are cleaning the air and helping someone who usually does not have a lot of money.

This is the latest in a series of blog posts that our Honda expert, Robert Isbell, is writing for RepairPal. Robert has worked at Honda dealerships for over 22 years as a technician, shop foreman and service manager. He has developed and led new owner clinics that educate new owners about their cars and he will be contributing to  our blog to educate our visitors about the methods for getting the most out of your service experience. Missed the preceding post? Click here.

The issue of trust and Automotive Repair Shops has been in the news for years.  I live in the SF Bay Area and about every 6 months one of the major, network-affiliated TV stations will do an undercover sting-like "expose" about Auto Repair Shops "ripping off" the public. AutoNation conducted a poll and found that for over 70% of the consumers called the number one complaint was a lack of trust in the process of having their vehicle serviced and repaired.  

This is the third in a series of blog posts that our Honda expert, Robert Isbell, is writing for RepairPal. Robert has worked at Honda dealerships for over 22 years as a technician, shop foreman and service manager. He has developed and led new owner clinics that educate new owners about their cars and he will be contributing to  our blog to educate our visitors about the methods for getting the most out of your service experience. Missed the preceding post? Click here.

This is the second in a series of blog posts that our Honda expert, Robert Isbell, is writing for RepairPal. Robert has worked at Honda dealerships for over 22 years as a technician, shop foreman and service manager. He has developed and led new owner clinics that educate new owners about their cars and he will be contributing to our blog to educate our visitors about the methods for getting the most out of your service experience. If you missed the preceding post about finding a shop, click here.

As of January 2, 2008 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is being sued by The State of California in the hope of overturning a denial for a waiver under The Clean Air Act to set stricter Emission Control standards.  There are potentially another 13-15 States ready to join California in this lawsuit.  What this means is that the Automakers, who are struggling to stay alive, will have to make several different Emission Control Systems for new vehicles so that they can be sold to the States that have adopted the new California Standards or the Federal Standards. For many years, there have been Federally Certified Emission Control vehicles and California Certified Emission Control vehicles.  In the 1980s there were some real differences in these Emission Controls, but as time has passed, the Federal Vehicles became much less common and the real differences in their Emission Control Systems are basically zero. (For more, see our Check Engine Light article.)