2009 Volkswagen Jetta TDI Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 2009 Volkswagen Jetta TDI as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

Refine by vehicle
Choose your vehicle
Known Problems

The driver door wiring loom cracks and degrades with time due to weathering and frequent opening and closing of the door. This problem affects the normal operation of all electronic components of the door including, but not limited to:

-Electric Windows

-Electric Door Locks

-Trunk Release

-Fuel Filler Door Release


-Interior Lights Stay On at All Times

-Keyless Locks

-Power Side Mirrors


The correction for this issue is to replace the driver side door wiring harness. For security purposes, the doors can be locked with the key. The interior lights should be shut of manually, and through the multi function display in the gauge cluster to prevent battery drain.

Shifting issues due to internal problems in high mileage automatic transmissions can be difficult to resolve without transmission replacement.

The 2009-2012 Volkswagen Jetta TDI 2,0L engine is equipped with a mechanical high pressure fuel pump (HPFP) which delivers highly pressurized fuel needed to run the clean diesel engine. This pump is know to fail at random in both new and used Jetta TDI models leaving the vehicle running very roughly, with very little power, unable to start, and/or OBD code P0087  

The most common causes of failure are fueling with gasoline or biofuel, and a factory defect in the HPFP. 

When the HPFP fails, it sends fragments of metal through the entire fuel system, necessitating replacement of every component, with exception of the gas tank. 

To help prevent this issue, ensure you are using only diesel fuel, and highly trafficked gas stations.

Additionally, Volkswagen has issued an extended warranty of 10 years/120,000 miles for this condition on select vehicles.   

One or both head lights may not work due to premature head light bulb burnout and/or bulb harness failure. Care should be taken to inspect the head light harness connector for damage when replacing bulbs. Damaged connectors should be replaced.

Electrical issues that are difficult to diagnose—and sometimes intermittent—are typically due to ground wiring issues. The most troublesome ground locations are under the battery or at the engine.

Because of issues with the glow plugs and/or the glow plug wiring harness from the control relay, the Check Engine Light may illuminate. Our technicians tell us there is a service bulletin, not a recall from Volkswagen regarding replacement of the glow plugs on 2004-2005 model years only.

Oil and carbon tend to build up, creating restrictions in the intake manifold. Symptoms will be loss of power (sometimes severe) and poor fuel economy.

Condensation in the heater case may cause a musty odor from the heating, ventilation and AC (HVAC) system after sitting for two hours or more. Our technicians tell us that a cleaner is available for the heater case and the drain system should be checked for debris.

Heater core leaks are common in this model, more so if the wrong anti-freeze/coolant is used in the cooling system.

One or more power windows may fail. Our technicians tell us this is commonly due to a failed window regulator which will require replacement.

Reverse gear failures and noise in the manual transmission models are common.