Volkswagen Jetta Problem Reports

Newest Volkswagen Jetta Problem Reports

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first the airbag light keep coming on and going off starting at 25,000 miles was told it was due to having items in front seat. Then Drivers seat airbag sensor went out at 34,000 miles and had to be replaced thankfully under warranty. Then at 78,000 airbag control module went out and also needs to be replaced VW says it will cost nearly 1,000 to replace. This should be a recall but isn't.

An accumulation of dust inside the body of the turn signal switch can cause a partially closed circuit, which results in the turn signal relay intermittently clicking at a high rate. Spraying a small amount of residue-free electronic contact cleaner (such as Electrosolve) inside the turn signal switch can resolve this problem. The turn signal relay is not the root cause of this problem, but may be damaged by it.

Vehicles with 2.0L engines consume oil at an unusually high rate. VW specifies the oil consumption should not be a cause for concern unless it exceeds 1 quart per 1000 miles.

Heater core leaks are common in this model, more so if the wrong anti-freeze/coolant is used in the cooling system.

The mass air flow (MAF) sensor may fail, resulting in drivability issues and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light.

Engine oil leaks are common from the valve cover gaskets and camshaft chain tensioner gasket.

2.0L turbo charged engines may develop a hesitation on acceleration and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light due to a failed high pressure fuel pump or a worn camshaft follower or camshaft. Our technicians tell us that whenever the high pressure fuel pump is replaced the camshaft and the follower should be checked for wear. The camshaft lobe pushes on the follower to operate the high pressure fuel pump. Frequent oil changes and use of synthetic oil may help with this wear issue.

2.0L turbo charged engines may develop a hesitation on acceleration and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light due to a failed high pressure fuel pump or a worn camshaft follower or camshaft. Our technicians tell us that whenever the high pressure fuel pump is replaced the camshaft and the follower should be checked for wear. The camshaft lobe pushes on the follower to operate the high pressure fuel pump. Frequent oil changes and use of synthetic oil may help with this wear issue.

One or both head lights may not work due to premature head light bulb burnout and/or bulb harness failure. Care should be taken to inspect the head light harness connector for damage when replacing bulbs. Damaged connectors should be replaced.

Fan assembly replaced. Dealer said there was a short in the electronics which led to fan not turning off after car was shut off.

The water pump may fail resulting in engine overheating and possible timing belt damage. Overheating and/or timing belt failure can result in very expensive engine repairs. As a precaution, it is recommended to inspect the timing belt and water pump at regular intervals.

Electrical issues that are difficult to diagnose—and sometimes intermittent—are typically due to ground wiring issues. The most troublesome ground locations are under the battery or at the engine.

Condensation in the heater case may cause a musty odor from the heating, ventilation and AC (HVAC) system after sitting for two hours or more. Our technicians tell us that a cleaner is available for the heater case and the drain system should be checked for debris.

A coolant leak may develop after oil filter replacement. The coolant o-ring seal can be damaged if the oil filter housing turns when removing or installing the oil filter. The recommended procedure is to hold the filter housing when tightening or loosening the oil filter.

Ignition wire breakdown is common, resulting in misfires.