Ford Explorer Problem Reports

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4wd vehicles may develop a squealing noise coming from the front wheels when driving below 30 mph. This is generally caused by dry excluder seals, lubricating the seals will commonly correct this concern.

Failure to change the power steering fluid can cause the fluid to become gray with metal particles. The contaminated fluid can damage the power steering pump resulting in a growling noise when the wheel is turned; the damaged pump will require replacement to eliminate the noise.. Life of the power steering gearbox and pump will be shortened if the fluid is not serviced regularly.

The O-ring seals in the AC couplings can develop leaks. The condenser can also crack and leak, which is sometimes misdiagnosed as a leaking coupling.  The condenser cracks out of sight, under the radiator support, so it looks like the coupler is leaking. Leak testing with fluorescent dye will help locate the exact source of the leak.

5.0L V8
Ignition wires
can rest on the exhaust manifolds if they are not properly secured. The hot manifolds will melt the insulation on the wires, damaging the wires and causing misfires.

A coolant leak may develop from the radiator. Ford has released and updated radiator and powertrain control module (PCM) software update to address this issue. The software update includes revised cooling fan operating parameters. Failure to complete both service procedures may result in repeated radiator failures.

My 2008 Explorer radiator failed on its own. I later noticed that my fan will always run trying to keep up with the heat generated. I also had to keep topping coolant. On making a little research, i found out that its a common problem with 2006 thru 2008 ford explorer and so many people had replaced their radiator. The cost of doing this can set you back almost a thousand bucks. I did replace the leaking radiator along with the reservoir and t...

The front brakes may stick, bind, or grab. This can happen when the front brake caliper pins become corroded. Cleaning or replacing the caliper pins will be necessary to correct this problem.

A failed heater blend door or actuator can cause the temperature control for the HVAC system to stop working. A clicking sound from the dash area would commonly indicate an actuator fault. If the heater gets stuck on the hottest setting, the heater blend door may be broken requiring replacement of the heater box to repair the issue.

The radius arm bushing may wear, causing a clunking or popping noise when driving over bumps. To repair, the bushings need to be replaced. Depending on the severity of the wear, the brackets may also need replacement. Driving with worn bushings will shorten tire life and cause tire cupping (uneven tire wear).

The radius arm bushing may wear, causing a clunking or popping noise when driving over bumps. To repair, the bushings need to be replaced. Depending on the severity of the wear, the brackets may also need replacement. Driving with worn bushings will shorten tire life and cause tire cupping (uneven tire wear).

The rear wiper may stop working. This could be due to a rear wiper motor that has failed requiring replacement.

If you experience difficulty starting the engine when cold, stalling at idle, or hesitations during acceleration, it may be the idle air bypass valve. This valve helps the vehicle idle steady when the accelerator pedal is not pressed.

Various problems with the 5-speed automatic transmission were common. These problems can be more common on the 2002 models with build dates before March, 2002. There are many service bulletins describing the diagnoses and repairs, which include fluid leak repairs, transmission software updates, or internal failures requiring a costly repair.

A cosmetic crack may develop on the plastic liftgate trim panel. Ford has released a service procedure to replace the applique without damage the the liftgate glass.

Our technicians tell us the spark plugs in this engine can be very difficult to remove. Ford has issued a service bulletin (08-7-6) to address this issue, which includes a recommended procedure on how to remove the plugs. Failure to follow the recommended procedure can result in the one or more spark plugs breaking off in the cylinder head.

The recommend procedure is as follows. Using this procedure will greatly reduce the chance of breaking a spark plug.

1. Break the spark plugs loose when the engine is warm.
2. Turn each plug 1/8 to 1/4 turn and soak the treads with 1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon of Motorcraft Carburetor Tune-Up Cleaner or a quality penetrating oil. Do not try to remove the plugs at this time.
3. Let the threads soak for at least 15 minutes.
4. After the soak period, tighten and loosen each spark plug, working it back and forth until the turning effort is reduced. Then, you can remove the spark plug.

There are special tools available to remove the broken spark plugs and repair shops will often charge additional labor time, over and above the quoted spark plug replacement cost, for the removal of each broken spark plug.