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Ford Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 50 Ford models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

An illuminated Check Engine Light could indicate that one or more of the ignition coils has failed due to excessive spark plug gap. To fix this problem, the ignition coils that have failed, the spark plugs, and all coil boots should be replaced.

Valve cover gasket failure is common, causing oil to leak onto the exhaust manifolds.

Warped front brake rotors may cause the steering wheel to shimmy when the brakes are applied. Our technicians tell us the brake rotors and pads should  be replaced to correct this concern.

Vacuum hose damage is common due to engine oil contamination or a plugged PCV valve.

The transmission vent tube may get bent while the engine is being serviced. This will cause excessive pressure when checking transmission fluid level.

The magnet for the camshaft position sensor may fall out of its mount and damage the synchronizers. This causes long crank times when starting the engine and may cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate. If this happens, both the magnets and the synchronizers need to be replaced.

3.0L
The front brake pads tend to wear faster than normal. Brake rotors have directional vents and are often installed on the wrong side.

Valve cover gasket failure is common causing oil to leak onto the exhaust manifolds.

Fuel injector seals can start to leak and allow oil into the fuel system. Symptoms of this might be rough engine idle or hard starting. Fuel that appears gray or black in the filter bowl when changing the fuel filter is another sign.
Using the correct oil for this engine is critical. Improper engine oil can foam in the high pressure system and not develop enough pressure for operation. Symptoms of this can be hard starting, long cranking time before start, rough engine idle, and a lack of power. Another sign is tiny bubbles in the oil on the engine oil dipstick after the engine is shut off. The additives in the correct oil that protect against foaming can still break down, so changing the oil at the correct intervals is important.

The front brake pads may wear faster than normal. The 4x4 hubs will need to be removed on 4WD models to service the front rotors.

Rough idling is often caused by ignition wires that are routed wrong or installed with damaged tips.

The O-ring seals in the AC couplings can develop leaks. The condenser can also crack and leak, which is sometimes misdiagnosed as a leaking coupling.  The condenser cracks out of sight, under the radiator support, so it looks like the coupler is leaking. Leak testing with fluorescent dye will help locate the exact source of the leak.

Engine oil leaks are known to develop around the rear crankshaft (main) seal and engine oil pan gasket.

If you experience poor idle quality and fuel economy (and the Check Engine Light illuminates) after the exhaust system or motor has been removed and replaced, it could be that the oxygen sensor wires are crossed at the rear of the motor. Wiring schematics should be checked to ensure that the correct harness plug is connected to the corresponding sensor.