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Ford Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 50 Ford models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

A failed heater blend door or actuator can cause the temperature control for the HVAC system to stop working. A clicking sound from the dash area would commonly indicate an actuator fault. If the heater gets stuck on the hottest setting, the heater blend door may be broken requiring replacement of the heater box to repair the issue.

Bogging, hesitation or stalling may be experienced during moderate to heavy acceleration. This can be caused by a failing of many sensors or modules in the fuel injection system. It is recommended to have an experienced shop perform diagnosis to find the root of the problem.

The Ford Mustang, with the 4.0L V6 engine, is known for a rough idle, engine stalling, loss of power, and misfires, accompanied by the check engine light.

The intake manifold O-ring gaskets commonly leak, which creates a large vacuum leak. This vacuum leak causes unmetered air to enter the engine, and the fuel system becomes insufficient to compensate for the large amount of air reaching the engine. 

Replacing the intake manifold gaskets corrects this concern.

A ticking noise may develop from the engine due to a warped exhaust manifold. Damaged exhaust manifolds will require replacement to correct this issue.

Transmission problems are common in this model, often as a result of a failed front pump. The pump loses its ability to create hydraulic pressure, which an automatic transmission needs to function. A sign of front pump failure can be a whine type noise.

The cooler for the EGR valve can leak coolant internally, which causes white smoke to come from the tail pipe. Hot exhaust gases are cooled by the EGR cooler before being circled back into the engine.

Spark plugs in the Ford Expedition can be very difficult to remove.

Ford has issued a service bulletin (08-7-6) to address this issue, which includes a recommended procedure on how to remove the plugs. Failure to follow the recommended procedure can result in the one or more spark plugs breaking off in the cylinder head.

The recommend procedure is as follows. Using this procedure will greatly reduce the chance of breaking a spark plug.

1. Break the spark plugs loose when the engine is warm.
2. Turn each plug 1/8 to 1/4 turn and soak the treads with 1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon of Motorcraft Carburetor Tune-Up Cleaner or a quality penetrating oil. Do not try to remove the plugs at this time.
3. Let the threads soak for at least 15 minutes.
4. After the soak period, tighten and loosen each spark plug, working it back and forth until the turning effort is reduced. Then, you can remove the spark plug.

There are special tools available to remove the broken spark plugs and repair shops will often charge additional labor for the removal of each broken spark plug.

The "Sync" wireless phone system may randomly loose "pairing" with the phone in use. This concern has been addressed with a software update which should be available from any Ford dealership service center at no charge.

A defective electronic throttle body (ETB) can cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate and could have limited to no throttle response. Our technicians tall us that replacing the electronic throttle body will commonly correct this concern.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate with code P0400 stored for an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) fault. Our technicians tell us if no EGR system faults are noted, updated powertrain control module (PCM) is available which should correct this issue.

In areas of high corrosion rear wheel bearings tend to fail. Ford agreed to replace these failed bearings at no cost. This program was to expire on December 31, 2002. Our technicians tell us it is unlikely Ford will replace any more of these failed bearings free of charge.