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Audi Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 40 Audi models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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244
Known Problems

A fluid leak may develop from the propeller shaft seal on the rear of the transmission. Our technicians tell us that replacing the seal will commonly correct this concern.

An ignition coil or spark plug may fail unexpectedly resulting in an engine misfire and possible illumination of the Check Engine Light.

Vacuum leaks, oxygen sensor failure, and catalytic converter efficiency faults can cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate.

An ignition coil or spark plug may fail unexpectedly resulting in an engine misfire and possible illumination of the Check Engine Light. Vehicles equipped with spark plug wires may also develop a misfire caused by a failed spark plug wire.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate with a knock sensor code stored. Our technicians tell us a revised knock sensor and bracket should be installed, along with heat shielding material to protect the new sensor, to correct this condition.

The Audi Q3 uses the 2.0TFSI direct injection engine. This engine is subject to carbon buildup in the intake system which can cause power loss, OBD codes and a check engine light, and a rough idle. In normal engines, the engine is cleaned by the gasoline flowing through the injectors and into the intake system, however, the Q3 uses direct injection so gasoline does not flow through common carbon buildup areas. 

Possible trouble codes include: P0300P0301P0302P0303P0304.

The solution is to remove the intake manifold and professionally clean the intake manifold, intake ports on the cylinder head, and the intake valves. This may need to be done in as few as 20,000 miles. 

Our technicians recommend having the constant velocity (CV) boots and CV joints inspected at each service. Servicing torn CV boots early can prevent the need to replace the CV half shaft or CV joint.

Various bushings—located around the subframe, suspension, and steering—deteriorate with age. A clunking noise when driving over bumps, accelerating, or stopping may be a sign of worn bushings.

Clogged drains can allow rainwater to accumulate in the plenum tray (at the base of the windshield). The water may leak into the vehicle's interior, brake booster, or electrical components, which can lead to major problems. Our technicians recommend keeping the tray clear of leaves, pine needles, and other debris.

Vacuum leaks, oxygen sensor failure, and catalytic converter efficiency faults can cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate.

Popping sounds from the rear of the vehicle may be heard moments after starting the engine, or when slowing to a stop. This noise is from the leak detection pump filling the fuel tank with air, and releasing to retest the system when it finds a fault. The sequence of faults identifying this issue are as follows:

  • Succession of loud pops from rear of vehicle
  • Pops go away, and fuel economy decreases 
  • Check engine light illuminates
  • OBD trouble code P2404 and/or P0441 is stored
  • Engine will not start after refueling (must crank for over 30 seconds)
  • Vibration when slowing to a stop

The cause is a valve which is mounted on the front of the intake manifold, commonly called the N80 valve, or EVAP system purge valve. The valve is designed to open under specific circumstances, but a worn valve will remain open at all times, preventing the pressurization of the fuel tank. 

Correction of the issue is to replace the N80 valve with the latest revision. 

The 2009-2016 Audi Q5 uses the 2.0TFSI or 3.2L FSI direct injection engines. These engines are subject to carbon buildup in the intake system which can cause power loss, OBD codes and a check engine light, and a rough idle. In normal engines, the engine is cleaned by the gasoline flowing through the injectors and into the intake system, however, the Q5 uses direct injection so gasoline does not flow through common carbon buildup areas. 

Possible trouble codes include: P0300P0301P0302P0303P0304, P0305, P0306.

The solution is to remove the intake manifold and professionally clean the intake manifold, intake ports on the cylinder head, and the intake valves. This may need to be done in as few as 20,000 miles. 

The 2008-2017 Audi S5 uses the 3.0TFSI and 4.2FSI direct injection engines. These engines are subject to carbon buildup in the intake system which can cause power loss, OBD codes and a check engine light, and a rough idle. In normal engines, the engine is cleaned by the gasoline flowing through the injectors and into the intake system, however, the S5 uses direct injection so gasoline does not flow through common carbon buildup areas. 

Possible trouble codes include: P0300P0301P0302P0303P0304, P0305, P0306.

The solution is to remove the intake manifold and professionally clean the intake manifold, intake ports on the cylinder head, and the intake valves. This may need to be done in as few as 20,000 miles.

A problem with the torque converter can cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate.

Erratic turn signal operation can be a result of a failing turn signal flasher relay which will require replacement.