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1990 Pontiac Grand Am Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 1990 Pontiac Grand Am based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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24
Known Problems

This engine may leak oil from the valve cover gasket.

A door window may move slowly or stop in mid travel due to a failing power window motor. The affected window may start working again after the motor cools off. Replacing the faulty window motor will commonly correct this concern.

The fuel pump may fail causing engine to stall and not restart.

The heater core under the right side of the dashboard may leak engine coolant which can puddle on the passenger front floor. The loss of coolant may cause an engine overheating condition. Our technicians tell us that removal of the dash board is necessary to replace the heater on these vehicles.

The Engine Control Module (ECM) can fail causing stalling, and engine and transmission drivability concerns.

The front struts may show signs of wear, or be excessively bouncy ride at freeway speeds. This may begin to occur at around 75,000 miles.

Front brake rotors can wear causing a pulsation felt in the brake pedal. Our technicians tell us this condition is best corrected by replacement of the front rotors and brake pads.

Brake fluid can become dirty and may cause problems in the brake system; it should be flushed every 60,000 miles.

The oxygen sensor can fail causing Check Engine Light illumination and the engine to run rich (burn more fuel than normal).

The rubber section of an automatic transmission cooler line may develop a fluid leak . In some cases the leaking section of hose can be replaced. In others, the complete cooler line must be replaced to correct this concern.

The intake manifold gasket may develop and external engine oil or coolant leak. In some cases, an internal coolant leak may occur causing coolant to mix with the engine oil. Our technicians tell us that operating the engine  with a coolant/oil mix can result in internal engine damage. Replacing the intake manifold gasket should correct these leaks.

The high pressure power steering hose will commonly leak fluid; it should be replaced.

The ignition coil housing may fail causing an engine misfire on one or more cylinders.

Timing gears may wear causing a mild to severe knocking noise from the front of the engine. Replacement of the timing gears is necessary.

The spark plug wire rubber boots may get soaked with oil, causing a misfire or rough idle.