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1993 Mercedes-Benz 300D Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 1993 Mercedes-Benz 300D based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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22
Known Problems

The sunroof may not work correctly due to failed components as a result of age and wear. Repairing a sunroof can be labor intensive and very costly.

Due to age and sun exposure, the interior wood trim cracks and the finish gets a cloudy haze. Replacement if the trim would be the most common solution to the problem.

A knocking noise from the front end can be caused by cracked strut tower bushings.

One or more blend door vacuum actuators may fail resulting in the incorrect output temperature from the HVAC system. Failed actuators will require replacement to restore proper HVAC operation.

Due to wear of mechanical parts in the control head, the buttons on temperature control assemblies work erratically or not at all. These control heads need to be replaced for this concern or when the display screen starts to fade out.

Vehicles with automatic level control that ride harshly in the rear (no give in the suspension) may have one or both dampening actuators which have failed. It is commonly recommended the actuators be replaced in pairs.

The lenses for head lights may become opaque (cloudy or hazy) as a result of sun exposure. This can reduce the effectiveness of the lights. Our technicians tell us plastic polishes can improve the clarity of the lenses, but replacement of the lamp housings is necessary to regain full intensity of the lights.

The engine wiring can degrade because the insulating material falls off leaving the bare wire exposed. This can cause many problems depending on which wires are exposed and what they touch.

A worn steering dampening shock can cause a fluid leak at the front of the vehicle. If a leak is noted from the dampening shock, our technicians tell us that it should be replaced.

The bushings for the shifter lever wear out to the point where they break and fall out. This causes excessive movement (loose feel) in the shifter lever and a clanging-type noise when changing gears.

High mileage vehicles may develop a transmission fluid leak from one or more of the oil seals.

 

The lower control arm bushings can wear and crack, leading to irregular and premature tire wear. Worn Ball joints can also cause similar tire wear problems. I some cases it may be necessary to replace the lower control arm, including bushings & ball joint to correct this concern.

Due to wear, high usage vehicles can experience ignition lock and tumbler failures. The ignition lock cylinder will generally require replacement to correct this concern.

The tie rod ends, idler arm, and/or drag link components of the steering linkage may wear prematurely. Please keep in mind the wheel alignment should be checked and adjusted when any of these items are replaced.

The brakes may begin to squeak at about the 50 percent wear point. This is due to the size and material used for the brake pads and rotors.  The brake rotor surfaces become uneven, causing a lip to form at the outer edge. This will generally require replacement of the rotors when the pads are worn (pad life varies depending on driving style and terrain).