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2010 Mazda Mazda6 Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 2010 Mazda Mazda6 based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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5
Known Problems

The engine may overheat due to erratic engine cooling fan operation as a result of a faulty cooling fan control module. Replacement of the fan control module would be necessary to correct this condition. Our technicians tell us the Mazda may provide assistance with the cost of this repair.

Mazda issued an emissions recall due to a problem with the Swirl Shutter Valve; this would cause the Check Engine light to illuminate.

A well-documented and well-known issue with the Mazda 6 built between 2005-2012 is harsh shifting from the 6-speed automatic transmission, and slight slippage between gears. This has been noted as hesitation to accelerate, especially from a stop.

Mainly, software issues have been to blame for these mishaps, but mechanical malfunctions related to shift solenoids and the valve body have also been major causes. Finally, the automatic transmissions in these models are sold as ‘sealed for life’, yet the transmission fluid does not seem to last the complete service life of the vehicle.

Correction of these issues often requires a simple software update, meaning the vehicle only needs to be plugged in, and the transmission controller receives new programming meant to fix these drivability concerns. In cases where this does not correct concerns, the transmission must be removed, inspected, and repaired, possibly requiring a complete rebuild.

To mitigate these issues from escalating to a full transmission rebuild, many technicians recommend replacing the transmission fluid at regular intervals, yet the manufacturer has never offered this guidance. 

A loud ticking noise (hydraulic valve lifter noise) may be heard from the top of the engine, particularly when the engine is still cold. The noise may occur more frequently on higher mileage vehicles; Hydraulic valve lash adjusters may need to be replaced to correct this issue. Following the maintenance schedule for oil changes will also help prevent a recurrence of the noise.