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2005 GMC Safari Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 2005 GMC Safari based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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16
Known Problems

A door window may move slowly or stop in mid travel due to a failing power window motor. The affected window may start working again after the motor cools off. Replacing the faulty window motor will commonly correct this concern.

A fluid leak may develop from the transmission output shaft seal. This leak may cause the transmission mount to become oil soaked and require replacement of the mount along with the leak repair.

Power brake systems using "hydro-boost" may leak power steering fluid from the hydro-boost unit located behind the brake master cylinder. Replacement of the hydro-boost unit is the common repair to correct this concern.

The headlight switch used on the GMC Safari is known to fail through normal operation. Since the headlight switch is also integrated into the interior lights, a malfunctioning switch can cause issues with interior lights as well.

  • Symptoms of a failed headlight switch include:
  • Headlights and taillights failing to turn on or off
  • Interior lights flicker, or fail to turn on or off
  • Gauge cluster lighting off or flickering with headlights on
  • Parking light malfunctions  

This issue is well known with General Motors Trucks and SUVs, and is solved by testing and, if needed, replacing the headlight/dimmer switch. Bad grounding wires at the tail-lights, and dirty/corroded tow package wires can also lead to some of these issues. 

The distributor may develop internal faults. This can cause a rough running engine or stalling condition, the Check Engine Light may or may not illuminate. Our technicians tell us that the distributor should be overhauled or replaced to correct this concern.

Our technicians highly recommend that the transmission is serviced every 30,000 miles to avoid problems and maintain optimal operating order.

The spark plugs should be replaced every 100,000 miles. Our technicians recommend replacing the spark plug wires also at this time.

Brake fluid can become dirty and may cause problems in the brake system; it should be flushed every 60,000 miles.

The power door locks may stop working in one or more doors due to a failed actuator. Replacement of the failed actuator should correct this concern.

Illumination of the Check Engine Light can be caused by a loose or worn gas cap.

The fuel pump may fail causing the engine to stall and not restart. Our technicians recommend replacing the fuel filter every 30,000 miles to help prevent undue strain on the fuel pump.

Extended life coolant may become contaminated and require cooling system service before the recommended 100,000 miles.

The Anti-lock brake system (ABS) control unit may fail internally causing the ABS warning light to illuminate.

The outside door handles are prone to breaking—all doors are affected by this condition.

On vans with rear AC, the AC may stop blowing cold air due to a damaged AC line near the back of the engine. It is common for these lines to rub on the engine block, causing a hole in the line and a refrigerant leak.