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What does code B0092 mean?

Code B0092 stands for Left Side Restraints Sensor.

In 1988, Chrysler became the first manufacturer to offer an airbag as standard equipment. Airbags were designed to supplement a vehicle's existing retrain system (i.e. the seatbelts). For this reason, the airbag system is referred to as the supplemental restraint system (SRS). Today all vehicles sold in the U.S. are equipped with an SRS system.

airbag

Airbag / Image source

The SRS system is typically composed of the following components:

  • SRS module: The SRS module is the computer responsible for monitoring and controlling the SRS system. It receives input from various sensor to determine control of SRS system outputs, such as the air bags and SRS warning light. Depending on the manufacturer, the SRS module may go by another name such as the sensing and diagnostic module (SDM).
  • Sensors: A number of sensors provide input to the SRS module. Common examples include crash sensors, safing sensors and occupant weight sensors.
    As the name implies, crash sensors indicate to the SRS module that a collision has happened. These sensors are typically switches that close upon impact. On the other hand, safing sensors inform the SRS module if a collision is severe enough to deploy the air bags.
    The occupant weight sensor (or passenger presence sensor) is also part of the SRS system. It informs the SRS module whether or not there is a passenger of adult proportions sitting in the passenger seat. If there is not, the SRS module will disable the passenger airbag.
  • Airbags: Both the nylon bag and inflator are housed inside an airbag assembly. The airbag is designed to inflate within a few milliseconds of a collision.
  • Clockspring: The clockspring is located between the steering column and wheel. It allows power to reach the airbag even when the steering wheel is turned.

Code B0092 indicates the SRS module has detected a problem with one of the SRS sensor circuits. For example, in the case of General Motors vehicles, the code means the SRS module senses a problem with the passenger presence sensor (PPS). On Ford vehicles, the code indicates the SRS module senses a problem with the left side restraint sensor.

B0092 symptoms

Common causes for B0092

Code B0092 is typically caused by one of the following:

  • A faulty SRS sensor
  • Wiring issues
  • Control module problems
Get it diagnosed by a professional

How to diagnose and repair B0092

Perform a preliminary inspection

Sometimes B0092 can pop up intermittently. This is especially true if the code is a history code and not current. Clear the code and see if it returns. If it does, the next step is to perform a visual inspection. A trained eye can check for issues such as broken wires and loose connections. If a problem is found, the issue should be repaired and the code cleared. If nothing is discovered, check for technical service bulletins (TSBs). TSBs are recommended diagnostic and repair procedures put out by the vehicle manufacturer. Finding a related TSB can greatly reduce diagnostic time.

Note: General Motors has a TSB for this problem which involves a pinched wiring harness to the PPS.

Check the circuit

The next step is to verify the sensor circuit is intact. This can be done using a digital multimeter (DMM). For example, the PPS has three wires connected to it: reference, return signal and ground. A 5-volt reference voltage is supplied to the PPS by a dedicated passenger presence module.

The DMM should measure approximately 5-volts coming to the sensor on the reference wire. To check the ground side of the circuit, the DMM should be switched to the ohmmeter setting. Continuity should be measured between the PPS sensor ground wire and ground. There should also be continuity between the PPS position return signal terminal and the SRS module.

If an issue is found with any portion of the circuit, the factory wiring diagram will need to be traced pinpoint the problem. Then, the problem can be repaired and the code cleared.

Check the sensor

Typically, the next thing a technician will do is check the sensor itself. For example, PSS operation can be checked with a digital multimeter. PSS signal voltage should change when a person sits in the passenger seat. If it does not, the sensor is faulty and should be replaced. Test procedures vary depending on the type of sensor in question.

Check the SRS module

In rare cases, the SRS module, or another related module may be at fault. For instance, in the case of General Motors vehicles, the passenger presence module should supply a 5-volt reference to the PPS sensor. If it does not, it may be faulty or require reprogramming.

Other diagnostic codes related to B0092

  • B0090: Code B0090 indicates the control module has detected a problem with the left frontal restrain sensor.
  • B0091: Code B0091 indicates the control module has detected a problem with the left frontal restrain sensor.
  • B0093: Code B0093 indicates the control module has detected a problem the front door satellite sensor.
  • B0094: Code B0094 indicates the control module has detected a problem with the center frontal restraint sensor.
  • B0095: Code B0095 indicates the control module has detected a problem with the right frontal restrain sensor.
  • B0096: Code B0096 indicates the control module has detected a problem with the right side restrain sensor.
  • B0097: Code B0097 indicates the control module has detected a problem with the right side restrain sensor 2.
  • B0098: Code B0098 indicates the control module has detected a problem with the right side restrain sensor 3.
  • B0099: Code B0099 indicates the control module has detected a problem with the roll over sensor.

Code B0092 technical details

There are often two-digit sub-codes associated with B0092. These codes indicate what type of circuit defect the control module has detected (short circuit, open circuit, etc.).

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