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1990 ford ranger is it a continuous fuel system or a return-less system
1990 Ford Ranger

1990 Ford Ranger is it a Continuous Fuel System or a Return-less System

(1990 Ford Ranger)
Again truck failed smog test, the tech said that it was due to a vacuum leak around the right side of the fuel tank. If so could it possibly be my fuel regulator? And could that be a reason that I have to pump like hell to get it to start? Once it does start it stays running till warmed up then will stall when I come to a stop, (not always) starts back up. Also, I like to put a universal fuel filter (haven't yet) before it gets to the carb/fuel jets. (good or bad idea) I would appreciate any help. This was my Dad's truck has been up in the high desert for the past 20 years. Just driven really to the dump only due to expired tags due to not passing smog test. It has always been a bitch to smog since he bought it used. I don't have the money if it fails again. I live in Commerce, CA (East LA). Help me, please!
What seems to make the problem better or worse? hard to start cold, but stalls more when driven around.
How long have you had this problem? Dad & Sister years, me just got truck
Tags: ford, ranger
1 answer & 2 comments
Popular Answer
on October 14, 2019
Your 1990 Ranger has fuel return lines to the tank.

Exactly what is your fuel system failing for? Evaporative emissions?

Your fuel pressure regulator is not in the fuel tank.

To determine the source of a "vacuum leak at your fuel tank", an evaporative emissions "smoke machine" is used to fill the tank with a vapor that will come out of areas where leaks are occurring. This is how you pin point the source. A well equipped and trained repair shop will have the equipment and personnel to use it.
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on October 22, 2019
I know my fuel regulator is not in the fuel tank, thank you very much. Since my sister took it for the test it failed (as usual). I told you what the Tech told them why it failed, "that there is/was a vacuum leak near the right backside of the fuel tank".
Like I said that the truck has always failed on the first try. Also, this could be why it has been "Non-Opt" all these years. Thanks, Gentlemen.
on October 23, 2019
Thanks for responding. Those of us who answer these questions daily are truly aiming to help. But you've kind of glossed over what I said and asked the same question. Answering again:

To determine the source of a "vacuum leak at your fuel tank", an evaporative emissions "smoke machine" is used to fill the evaporative emission system with a vapor that will come out of areas where leaks are occurring. This is how you pin point the source. A well equipped and trained repair shop will have the equipment and personnel to use it.

Further:

Your evaporative emissions system is comprised of a purge flow valve, a purge solenoid, a sealed fuel tank, a carbon canister, hoses and fittings. Anything that is not sealing properly -- such as a valve that is stuck open, a line that is leaking, a solenoid that vents the system -- and so on -- will cause the failure. Hands on testing is needed by someone with proper knowledge and equipment.
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on October 14, 2019
Your 1990 Ranger has fuel return lines to the tank.

Exactly what is your fuel system failing for? Evaporative emissions?

Your fuel pressure regulator is not in the fuel tank.

To determine the source of a "vacuum leak at your fuel tank", an evaporative emissions "smoke machine" is used to fill the tank with a vapor that will come out of areas where leaks are occurring. This is how you pin point the source. A well equipped and trained repair shop will have the equipment and personnel to use it.
Sign in to reply
on October 22, 2019
I know my fuel regulator is not in the fuel tank, thank you very much. Since my sister took it for the test it failed (as usual). I told you what the Tech told them why it failed, "that there is/was a vacuum leak near the right backside of the fuel tank".
Like I said that the truck has always failed on the first try. Also, this could be why it has been "Non-Opt" all these years. Thanks, Gentlemen.
on October 23, 2019
Thanks for responding. Those of us who answer these questions daily are truly aiming to help. But you've kind of glossed over what I said and asked the same question. Answering again:

To determine the source of a "vacuum leak at your fuel tank", an evaporative emissions "smoke machine" is used to fill the evaporative emission system with a vapor that will come out of areas where leaks are occurring. This is how you pin point the source. A well equipped and trained repair shop will have the equipment and personnel to use it.

Further:

Your evaporative emissions system is comprised of a purge flow valve, a purge solenoid, a sealed fuel tank, a carbon canister, hoses and fittings. Anything that is not sealing properly -- such as a valve that is stuck open, a line that is leaking, a solenoid that vents the system -- and so on -- will cause the failure. Hands on testing is needed by someone with proper knowledge and equipment.

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