2006 Volkswagen Jetta Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 2006 Volkswagen Jetta as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

The driver door wiring loom cracks and degrades with time due to weathering and frequent opening and closing of the door. This problem affects the normal operation of all electronic components of the door including, but not limited to:

-Electric Windows

-Electric Door Locks

-Trunk Release

-Fuel Filler Door Release


-Interior Lights Stay On at All Times

-Keyless Locks

-Power Side Mirrors


The correction for this issue is to replace the driver side door wiring harness. For security purposes, the doors can be locked with the key. The interior lights should be shut of manually, and through the multi function display in the gauge cluster to prevent battery drain.

An ignition coil or spark plug may fail unexpectedly resulting in an engine misfire and possible illumination of the Check Engine Light. Vehicles equipped with spark plug wires may also develop a misfire caused by a failed spark plug wire.

The 2006-2016 Jetta uses FSI and TSI direct injection engine. These engines are subject to carbon buildup in the intake system which can cause power loss, OBD codes and a check engine light, and a rough idle. In normal engines, the engine is cleaned by the gasoline flowing through the injectors and into the intake system, however, since the Jetta uses direct injection, gasoline does not flow through common carbon buildup areas. 

Possible trouble codes include: P0300P0301P0302P0303P0304.

The solution is to remove the intake manifold and professionally clean the intake manifold, intake ports on the cylinder head, and the intake valves. This may need to be done in as few as 20,000 miles. 

The 2006-2008 Volkswagen Jetta and Jetta GLI with the 2.0L Turbo FSI engine looses power if the turbocharging system has a leak. The most common turbo boost leak is a torn rubber diaphragm on the diverter valve, which is intended to open only if pressure gets too high. Common symptoms are increased turbo noise when letting off of the gas pedal, and power loss.

If there is a turbocharging system leak, the system will need to be inspected, and the defective seals and/or valve will require replacement. 

The flywheel for the 2006-2008 Volkswagen Jetta with the 2.0L Turbo engine is a non-conventional "Dual Mass" flywheel. It is known to make light rattling noise when the engine is cold, and should subside once the engine temperature raises. If the rattle doesn't go away when the engine warms, the flywheel may have failed.

If the dual mass flywheel has failed, the only solution is to replace the flywheel.

2.0L turbo charged engines may develop a hesitation on acceleration and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light due to a failed high pressure fuel pump or a worn camshaft follower or camshaft. To help prevent this issue from occurring, the cam follower should be inspected every 10,000 - 15,000 miles. The camshaft lobe pushes on the follower to operate the high pressure fuel pump. 

To correct this issue one or all of the following will need replacement: the camshaft, high-pressure fuel pump, and/or the cam follower.


One or more power windows may fail. Our technicians tell us this is commonly due to a failed window regulator which will require replacement.

Reverse gear failures and noise in the manual transmission models are common.

Shifting issues due to internal problems in high mileage automatic transmissions can be difficult to resolve without transmission replacement.

Extensive transmission damage can occur in some of the automatic transmission models when the transmission oil cooler fails and allows coolant to mix with the automatic transmission fluid.

The water pump and/or other cooling system may develop a coolant leak. Oil leaking from the  valve cover gasket is also common.

A damaged water pump impeller may cause an engine overheating condition. Our technicians tell us the repair should include replacement of the water pump, thermostat, and flushing the cooling system.

Electrical issues that are difficult to diagnose—and sometimes intermittent—are typically due to ground wiring issues. The most troublesome ground locations are under the battery or at the engine.

Condensation in the heater case may cause a musty odor from the heating, ventilation and AC (HVAC) system after sitting for two hours or more. Our technicians tell us that a cleaner is available for the heater case and the drain system should be checked for debris.