Journeyman

Journeyman

280 points

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Herb Ackside

Boston, MA

I have been an ASE certified master technician as well as being L1 certified for over 20 years. I am also an ASE and ICAR certified auto body and paint technician as well as being a licensed auto appraiser. I frequently attend automotive training seminars to stay abreast of the latest technologies, tools, equipment and repair techniques being made available to our industry. My favorite vehicles to repair on are the ones that other techs turn away due to the level of difficulty or the amount of time they would have to invest to diagnose and repair a customer complaint. I use technical service and repair manuals like Alldata, Mitchell and Identifix as well as various manufacturer websites to assist me when I repair these problem vehicles. Besides all this technical help, I rely on personal and past experiences as well as brain storming with fellow technicians that enjoy a repair challenge as much as I do.


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Questions & Answers | Problem Reports | Reviews | Comments

Question Answered: 

The condition you described is very common on your type of vehicle. A body shop that can replace the entire hinge assembly would be my recommendation. The problem is that the holes where the bushings go in the hinge have been elongated or made larger by the weight of the door and lack of lubrication. Also, your hinges are probably welded in place rather than bolted so it makes it very difficult for a do it yourselfer to attempt repairs at home.


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Question Answered: 

You have a float sensor inside the master cylinder that will trip the brake lamp when the brake fluid drops to a certain level. Check the brake fluid level in your master cylinder and top off as needed to stop the dash brake lamp to stop coming on as you described. Be sure to check under the vehicle to make sure that you dont have a brake fluid leak or that your brake pads or shoes are worn out. Any of these conditions will cause the float level to drop inside the master cylinder, triping the lamp.


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Question Answered: 

Your vehicle is equipped with an air bag system that has a sensor under the seats to calculate weight on the seat. This device helps the air bags deploy at different speeds based on the passenger’s weight or not deploy if no passenger is on the seat. This sensor is more than likely malfunctioning. Based on the year of your car, it’s probably still covered under warranty so call your favorite GM dealer and have them look at it for you.


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Question Answered: 

Many new vehicles do NOT have transmission dipsticks, special tools and procedures are required to check and add fluid into the transmission. (Usually by pumping fluid up in through the drain port) I recommend you bring your vehicle into your local VW dealer or transmission shop and let them take a look at it for you. What ever you do, DO NOT remove the transmission drain plug as you will disable the vehicle and it will have to be towed to a facility with the proper equipment to refill your transmission.


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Question Answered: 

I recommend that you STOP driving your vehicle until the brake fluid leak is found and repaired. You didnt say in what area of the van you see the brake fluid leaking but based on the year of your Voyager and the area of the country that you live in, you probably have rusty, rotted, leaking brake lines, a repair that can be costly depending on how many brake lines need to be replaced.


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Question Answered: 

I cant tell you if your power window motor is about to go but if all the windows are slow, try cleaning out the run channels (where the glass glides up and down)and spraying some silicone spray into them. This should get the windows moving smoother and putting less strain on the window motors.


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Question Answered: 

Check your owners manual for service recommendations. Many timing belts get replaced at 60K miles but I have seen some that do not need to be replaced until 90k or 105k miles. Some newer engines have gone back to using timing chains and these engines do not have a recommended service interval for timing chains. So read, read, read your service interval recomendations in your owners manual.


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Question Answered: 

Which "pump" do you speak of? If your talking about the Power Steering pump, it may still have air in the lines. You can sometimes work the air out by simply turning the steering wheel from lock to lock about 8 or 10 times. Sometimes the air will work itself out after a few days of driving the vehicle.


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Question Answered: 

The A/C compressor will usually come on when you set your climate control to "Defrost" to act as a dehumidifier to remove moisture from inside the cab area. If you cant afford to replace the A/C clutch assembly or the entire compressor at this time, simply unplug the connector at the compressor clutch and secure it away from the belts, moving parts or heat sources that could damage the plug. Doing this will keep the A/C clutch from being energized. The problem is not solved but it will stop the screaming noise and power loss you spoke of.


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Question Answered: 

Check to make sure that you didnt put the left caliper on the right side and vice versa. The bleeder screws should be at a high point on the caliper, if they are low on the caliper you will never get the air out. Air always travels to the highest point. Also, did you bleed the new master cylinder before you installed it? Did you follow the proper 4 wheel bleeding procedure for your vehicle?


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