Journeyman

Journeyman

317 points

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Chevy Ase

Oakland, CA

I have been a Technician since 1986, and a Journeyman Tech since 1994. I am currently working at a Chevrolet dealership in CA. I am ASE and GM certified. I will be happy to answer any GM vehicle questions and provide what information and guidance I can. Email: ChevyASE@aol.com Cell Phone: 510-334-6152 (please text, I don't answer calls from numbers I don't recognize) Hours: Tuesday-Friday 0800-1800 and Saturday 0800-1600.


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Question Answered: 

Check the vehicle grounds first. Make sure all are tight and not corroded. Then check all the fuses. Then, if they all are good, replace the Underhood Bussed Electrical Center (the box with all the fuses and relays). There have been some issues. Has anyone been trying to open the UBEC or do any testing on it?


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Question Answered: 

Check and repair the wiring to the heater and radio circuits, then fix the wires the right way from the ignition switch, then adjust the ignition switch on the column to the right setting. Then charge and hook up battery and try starting it again. Sounds like you have a couple issues. The ignition switch is misadhusted and someone has tried to bypass the wiring because they could not fix the problem before you got to it. Fix and adjust it right and it should work fine. Also check fuses to make sure someone didn't just tie stuff in to other stuff to make it work.


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Question Answered: 

Yes. But let me understand what you are saying. It was missing, died and would not restart. Then, you kept trying to start it and it now won't crank? You say you hear the solenoid click. Have you checked the basics? Start with your fuses. If they test good, use a test light to check for signal getting to the starter solenoid on the S terminal (should be a purple, blue or red wire depending on if someone has done repairs before or not). If there is signal there, but it won't crank, use a DVOM and see what the actual voltage of that signal measures. If it is battery voltage, then the starter may be junk. If you actually hear (and should feel) the starter armature engage and it won't spin (crank), then you need to remove your spark plugs and see if a cylinder is hydro-locked. Once the spark plugs are out, try cranking it again. If the starter is not actually clicking or engaging (as you may be hearing the relay click and not the starter), and you have no signal to the S terminal, then you need to check the anti theft system. Let us know what you find and we can help you further.


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Question Answered: 

First off, there are no reverse solenoids. They were probably referring to the 1-2 and 2-3 shift solenoids. Only the 2-3 shift solenoid is active during reverse operation. If you have a scan tool (not a code scanner) you can check the parameter for that solenoid and see if it is working. If you don't have access to a scan tool, you can just remove the transmission pan and "shotgun" diagnose the problem by replacing the 2-3 shift solenoid (there are 2 solenoids mounted to the valve body and they will be right next to each other and they are identical. In order to not replce both and to tell them apart, it is the one with the RED and YELLOW wires going to it, not the one with the RED and GREEN wires.), but if you can't tell which one it is, you'll have to do both to be sure. If the problem still exists, then you need further diag because you have either an Input Housing Assembly issue, Manual Valve Link disconnected, Reverse Input Clutch Assembly issue or possibly a Lo and Reverse Clutch issue. Most of these will require the transmission be pulled out and dissassembled for repair or complete overhaul. Sorry to not have better news for you.


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Question Answered: 

Right side of the cylinder head behind the exhaust manifold. Very back corner.


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Question Answered: 

That can vary greatly in price depending on what's wrong with it. If it is just a simple conection issue, it'll be cheap. But if you need a cluster, ECM, or other module replaced, it can climb into the hundreds. You need to have the cause of the inop tach diag'd to know what it will cost to fix.


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Question Answered: 

Depends on the price. ROAD TEST it on rough roads and listen for popping, rattles and clunks from the front end. They had lots of issues with this and there are lots of bulletins and fixes (one bulletin list 9 different possible issues and corrections!!!). Secondly, at slower speeds, especially on turns, listen for grinding in the front end. We have done lots of front hubs on these. Listen for clunks/rattles during parking lot manuevers and over small bumps like a driveway lip. There have been steering column noises which we have been correcting. Have someone or some shop that you know scan the vehicle for codes. Be aware of ABS speed sensor codes and ECM O2 Sensor and Cat Efficiency codes. If it needs a catalytic convertor and is not under warranty of some kind, they can get expensive. Listen for exhaust rattles as telltale signs of cats going out. Last, but not least, take it to a shop (preferrably a GM dealer) and get a complete vehicle inspection done. Just tell them you are thinking of buying it, but not from who or where. If it is at a Dealer now, find another one just to get an unbiased opinion. If the person or dealer selling the vehicle won't let you do any of this stuff I listed, run, don't walk, away from the car. If all the above checks out, and the price is right (check Kelly Blue Book online @kbb.com for the going rate in your area) then you should be ok. Given the mileage and year, I would guess that most of what I mentioned has already come, been diagnosed and fixed, or they are getting rid of it due to some of the things I mentioned. Good luck and happy buying.


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Question Answered: 

When you turn on the system, does air come out anywhere at all? Do you hear the fan running? Do all of the functions on the HVAC controller work? The fresh air intake filter is located behind the glove box. Here are the instructions for replacing it, but it is not your problem. You should however check it whenever you check your engine air filter. It has about the same service life. Passenger Compartment Air Filter Replacement Removal Procedure 1. Open the instrument panel (I/P) compartment. The access door for the passenger compartment air filter is located behind the glove box.  2. Tilt the I/P compartment door down by squeezing in on each side of the bin until the door stops can be removed from the tracks.  3. Lower the I/P compartment completely.  4. Open the passenger compartment filter door by reaching through the opening in the rear of the I/P compartment and raising the tab until the door can be opened downward.  5. Remove the filter by sliding the filter out of the passenger compartment filter housing. Installation Procedure Important: Make certain that the air flow indicator is pointing down.  1. Install the new filter by sliding the filter into the passenger compartment filter housing.  2. Close the passenger compartment filter door and snap the tab down to latch the door.  3. Raise the I/P compartment door until the door stops contact the frame. Slowly raise the door until the doorstops snap into their tracks.


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Question Answered: 

You may or may not need a new fuel tank. But first, drop the tank and check the fuel tank module on top where the fuel lines hook to. I would be more likely to bet that one of the plastic connectors is cracked and you just need a tank module (still around $300-$400, at least in CA). I haven't replaced too many tanks, but lots and lots of modules.


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Question Answered: 

The simple answer, and probably the issue, is CHECK YOUR FUSES. Then, if they are all good, you need to look at a wiring diagram and see what he "might" have tapped into.


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