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Chuck Coats

Austin, TX

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Question Answered: 

There is a rubber grommet that may have fallen out of the brake pedal.. The brake light switch has a plunger that hits the grommet. If that grommet is gone then there will be nothing to depress the plunger on the switch which will make the lights stay on. Get a flashlight and look up your brake pedal and find the switch.. it should have at least 2 wires going to it. It will have a plunger on it and that plunger will rest against a grommet when the brake pedal is not depressed.. Make sure that grommet is still in place. It is a simple part to install and they car very inexpensive.. It will have to be purchased from the dealership. They usually are not available aftermarket.. Good luck Chuck


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Call your local Jeep dealership and give the service department your VIN.. they will advise you.


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Could be a headlight switch, hazard switch or a ground problem. Not sure what circuit your tail lights are on but you will need a wiring schematic to trace down the power and ground circuits to determine if it is a component or a wiring problem.. Best of luck, these things can become a nightmare.. Chuck


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Are you referring to a pulsating brake pedal while braking ? If this is happening then your brake rotors are likely warped. The mfg usually has a minimum runout and the rotor are likely beyond that limit. If this is the case then the rotors will have to be resurfaced or replaced.. Most brake rotors are so thin when they are made that there isn't much extra metal on the rotor to dress it and it still remain within specification. Brake rotors are not as expensive as they were years ago.. I call them "disposal" rotors and almost never machine them any more.. once I take them off then they go in the garbage can.. The amount of labor it requires to machine a rotor in most cases cover the cost of a new one.. Good luck Chuck


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Call your local General Motors dealership and give them the VIN.. They will advise you.


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Typically the front line goes to the rear wheels and the rear line goes to the front. You can trace the lines and see where they go.. Only a few times have I seen them differently that the way I just stated.


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A fused jumper wire is a wire that is run from a power source , like from the positive battery post and the wire has a fuse in the middle of the wire at some point.. That way if you accidentally short the power wire to ground, then the fuse will blow and open the power circuit. It is just a safety feature to have on a hot wire.. a built in circuit breaker . good luck , Chuck


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It is either losing spark or losing fuel.. If there is anyway you can install a spark tester on one of the spark plug wires and let the engine run and see if the spark is still present when the engine stalls out.. Also you may want to install a fuel pressure gauge and watch for a fuel pressure drop when the engine dies. These things are notorious for defective distributors.. I see that you replaced the distributor but just because the part is new or reman then dont just assume that it is working properly. Good luck with your vehicle, this may be a challenge. Chuck


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You need to have a complete brake inspection done immediately ! The grinding noise is likely coming from the brake pad backing plate rubbing against the brake rotor. If this is happening then the rotor is likely defective . If you continue to drive it then the caliper will become so hot that the brake fluid will boil, then you will likely ruin the brake caliper and brake hose. The longer you drive it the more dangerous it is and the more money it will likely cost you. Best of luck to you Chuck


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Question Answered: 

I have seen this a lot of times, especially on Ford Rangers.. The problem I encounter is that part of the line that goes from the clutch master cylinder to the slave cylinder has an upward loop in it somewhere .. This is where the air likely becomes trapped. Air will accumulate in the highest point and usually will be in the plateau of that loop. Once it is trapped in that loop it will not be able to move down through fluid that is below it in a lower section of the line, no matter how much you try to bleed it out.. What you have to do is remove the clutch master cylinder but leave the line connected. If there is anyway possible to straighten up the line without getting a kink in it then that is what I would try.. With it straightened and no upward loops in it then try and pump the clutch master cylinder up by hand while keeping any loop out of the line. You can insert a screwdriver in the back of the clutch master cylinder to depress the plunger while someone opens the bleeder on the slave.. I know it is a lot of trouble but I have seen great techs spend hours and hours trying to rid the air from the system.. If you do not have a upward loop in the hydraulic line then you may have a defective slave or even the new master cylinder could be the culprit. Parts from China and Mexico are just about the only thing available any more and usually several times a week I get a defective part right out of the box.. Best of luck ! Chuck


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