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Brian Glastetter

Nuevo, CA

I am a 21+ year Senior Master Technician and a Master ASE technician at a Ford dealership. I take pride knowing that I deliver a quality repair with honesty and integrity.


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Question Answered: 

To go a step further from the previous answer: Did you recently have the differential fluid changed? The fluid for this differential is very specific: 75w-90 and a bottle of “friction modifier XL-3.” If this modifier additive was left out on a fluid exchange, this symptom typically happens in a Ford locker differential. Try adding a bottle (available at a Ford dealership) and drive a few miles to work it in before committing to an expensive repair.


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Question Answered: 

Whew, lots of problems with this one: The high-pressure oil pump is located on TOP of the engine and does NOT require engine removal. The low-pressure oil pump even does not require engine removal- it is located behind the harmonic balancer in a housing (gerotor style). The shop manual does state that engine removal is required for oil pan removal, but all the technicians that I know “sneak” it out by lifting the motor on a jack stand. Please, ask more questions as to the exact nature of the required repair before authorizing this work. Alarm bells are ringing in my head.


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Question Answered: 

The starter location on this vehicle is not typical at all- it bolts to the top of the transmission. It is accessed from on top of the vehicle and is under the air cleaner and brackets. A tight fit to say the least- the steel fuel lines are routed over the top of it just enough to make a preacher swear. Remember to disconnect the negative battery cable. The workshop manual does not give much insight, but I do remember that even when all fasteners are finally disconnected, it is a bugger to remove it from the vehicle. FYI- look closely at the flex plate for any damage while it is out. I had one that was diagnosed as a starter only to find that the teeth of the flex plate were gone requiring the transmission to be removed. Flex plate replacement is not for the faint of heart. After performing many repairs on this type of vehicle, I conclude that this car is not made to be worked on.


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Question Answered: 

To answer this correctly, I would have to have more information. One of the most common problems with this system is the transfer case shift motor failing. If your 4x4 light is flashing when you try to activate it, this may be your culprit, but the system has too many different components and circuits to know how to answer your question without more information.


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Question Answered: 

This one will be tough to answer specifically since I do not know which of the three automatic transmissions that your vehicle could be equipped, so I will have to be general. The most likely cause of the slow up shift when cold is hardened clutch and servo seals. With age, the rubber type seals become hardened- especially when cold. They usually soften a bit when they get a bit of temperature in them. I over-hauled transmissions that I actually had the rubber seals crack and break they were so brittle. To remedy this, an overhaul is in order, but if finances restrict that, try a bottle of transmission conditioner additive, but this usually does not cure many tranny problems. I hope this helps.


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Question Answered: 

I have come across a couple things that could cause a water sloshing noise: First check the coolant level of the cooling system. If it is low, suspect a leaking heater core, but since you did not mention any coolant smell or fogged up windshield, I have to eliminate that theory. Try turning on the defroster or A/C for a few minutes (both activate the A/C compressor) and observe if any water drips from the evaporator case drain tube. Like a cold glass of water, the evaporator condenses water in the air, which is drained out a tube by the firewall. If none comes out, it may be clogged which could be what you are hearing. Another concern could be a water leak from the windshield area collecting somewhere in the dash. Of course, a “Big Gulp” left in the cup holder makes sloshing noises. I hope this helps.


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Question Answered: 

To answer your question accurately, more details are needed. Two things have to occur when you activate the 4x4 system: the transfer case engages the internal locking hub, which turns the front driveshaft; the second is the 4x4 hubs being engaged to rotate the front wheels. The first thing to be done is to determine if the front driveshaft is turning. To do this, have a partner squat down near the driver’s side of the vehicle and observe if the front driveshaft is rotating when slowly driving in 4x4. If so, then the concern may be in the front hubs; if no rotation is noted, the concern lies in the transfer case. There are two different types of front hubs: manual- where we have to get our shoes muddy to activate them or automatic, which lock when the driveshaft is rotated. I hope this helps.


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Question Answered: 

As stated by the previous mechanic, misfire codes can be caused by several different concerns. Ford Motor Company is now recommending replacing the spark plugs at a lower mileage interval- 75k miles. We see the COP or the coil on plug as the most common concern causing a misfire. We have the latest technology to stress test all the coils, but this is very time consuming. One technician in our shop simply uses a long screwdriver in the coil boot and gap grounds it against a suitable location and examines the spark. Most failed coils will only give a small yellow spark like a lawn mower. A healthy coil will give a blue spark with a notable crack noise. Comparing two different coils-, one failed and one healthy and it is an easy test. Like the previous mechanic, relocating coils, injectors and spark plugs usually is a good method of isolating the failed component if the rudimentary coil test does not yield results. I hope this helps.


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Question Answered: 

Few issues have troubled technicians more than the infamous “Change oil soon light.” We have even had quick lube shops send customers to me at the dealership to shut off this light. Yes, the engineer that designed this system most certainly had flunked out of the “User Friendly” semester of college. The most common problem is between step 1 and 2 of the owner’s manual. The natural tendency is that when we scroll through the menu to the “oil life XX%” mode, we lift our finger. This is where most go wrong. Once the “oil life XX%” comes up on the menu, do NOT lift from depressing the button- just hold for 5 seconds until the “Reset for new oil life” comes up. Again, do not lift your finger. The parking assist is a different concern altogether. The parking assist light illuminated when it is deactivated- opposite of what seems logical. It was probably the same design engineer as the oil change system. If the system is disabled, (illuminated) it is intended to cycle back when the key is shut off. I hope this helps.


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Question Answered: 

These concerns are not directly on the same circuits and should not be interrelated, but vehicles have a funny way of defying logic at times. I checked for technical service bulletins on Ford's technical website with no solid results. The insrument cluster has 3 different fuses for power. One is under hood in location F1.62 (30A) and two are under the dash in F2.16 (5A) and F2.8 (10A). A simple test light is the easiest method of verifying a blown fuse. At the dealership, we have seen instrument cluster failures (or a individual component within) at times. If power sources are not an issue, then most probably a broken solder circuit internal to the instrument cluster is the culprit. This may sound primative, but give the top of the dash a whack with your open hand, at times we see a suspected solder joint make contact and start working again. If is does come back on, it is definately not fixed- only temporarily working at the moment and waiting for the pothole at the corner street to stop working again. This instrument cluster is a programable module that requires a knowledgable and adequately equipped technician to replace. I can not see any relationship to the previous repairs unless a power surge had some influence. Hope this helps.


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