Technician

Technician

140 points

More About Points »

Rojo1

Canyon, TX

I graduated high school in 1990 and gained my ASE Master Tech cert in 1994. My father has run a small shop in a small Texas town of about 11,000 for the better part of 30 years. He specializes in air-cooled VW''s and has a very loyal following. For the majority of my career, I turned my wrenches for dealerships in New Mexico. Manufacturers include Mitsubishi, Hyundai, Subaru, Mazda, and Kia but I spent better than a quarter of my career in my father's shop repairing air cools and whatever else rolled in the door. I am strong in automotive systems diagnosis. I take great pride in my work and value my reputation. Before offering advice on a question, I will always ask a few of my own. This way I won't waste any of your time getting your vehicle back on the road.


Recent Activity

Questions & Answers | Problem Reports | Reviews | Comments

Question Answered: 

By "heat actuator" are you referring to the electronic actuator mounted to the air box inside the cab?


Flag This
Question Answered: 

Before you go and replace another solenoid, take a look at your battery. A bad solenoid CAN prevent the car from starting but it CANNOT keep the dash lights from coming on. Make sure the battery is clean. If there is one thing you should keep clean and free of grime, it's the battery. Remove the negative cable and then the positive. What you are looking for is acid corrosion, oxidation, or clamps that are worn out. Corrosion occurs most commonly in, on, and around the clamps. BE CAREFUL! Corrosion is a solid form of sulfuric acid so don't stir it up. Breathe some of that into your nose and you will not be happy. Most battery clamps are made of lead. When sulfuric acid contacts the lead, a chemical reaction occurs and causes the formation of corrosion which is normally white or green in color and appears chalky or somewhat similar to mold in severe cases and left unchecked will destroy paint and burn holes in the metal beneath. The reason it almost always begins at the battery cable clamps is because the point at which the lead post exits the plastic case is not sealed. Acid vapor exits the case at this point and goes right to work on the clamps. In time, the corrosion will actually leech its way from one end of the battery cable to the other and this can be a costly repair. Inspect each clamp carefully because it may not be obvious. Look at the inner surface of the clamp and the surface of the post. Oxidation will cause lead to look very dull and will greatly inhibit conduction of current. A battery post cleaning tool is nice but make sure it uses a wire brush to clean, not a blade. The blade type can remove enough lead from the post that even a new clamp won't get tight. If the corrosion is excessive, replace the clamps. If oxidation is the culprit, clean clamps and posts with the wire brush. Next, find a clean gallon jug and some baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). Fill the jug with warm water and about a half cup of soda and mix thoroughly. Sodium bicarbonate is a base that will neutralize the sulfuric acid. If necessary, pour some solution into another container and submerse the cable end for several minutes. Pour the remaining solution over the battery and any acid will react by bubbling. Keep rinsing until the bubbling stops then rinse with plain water to avoid getting the solution inside the battery vents. Do not pour soda onto the battery and try to add water or you may neutralize the acid on the inside. Bad. Once everything is clean, put it all back together and make sure the clamps are tight and their mating surfaces clean. To help prevent this problem in the future, smear a little grease around the base of the post. Install the clamp and spray paint the clamp and post. Or you can by battery protector but it will stay sticky and collect dirt. Number one rule---keep it clean and your battery will last a long time. If you have any questions, just ask. Good luck


Flag This
Question Answered: 

How big are the hoses and to what part of the crank case are they attached? Possibilities include crank case ventilation (PCV) or coolant. Most likely would be a PCV hose which will connect at some point to the intake system. I'm assuming the car has been running.


Flag This
Question Answered: 

Okay, the catalyst monitor will only pass under specific conditions. These conditions can be produced during what is called an OBDII drive cycle. However, this will not force the catalyst monitor to run if there is a problem with the system. If the vehicle is not displaying any obvious symptoms, the best way to find the cause is through the use of a scan tool though I'm thinking they don't have one. A few things that can prohibit the cat monitor to run are a RICH condition (worn plugs, bad plug wire or coil, leaking injector or one that is not atomizing the fuel), a LEAN condition (inoperative fuel injector, vacuum leak, exhaust leak near one of the O2 sensors or near the cat, bad O2 sensor, stuck EGR valve). Now you said the monitor would not pass, then you said it had a code. A monitor can refuse to run for a long time before the computer will set a code but if a code is set, the monitor will never run. If you have a code, please tell me what it is. I need all the information you have.


Flag This
Question Answered: 

Is the transmission not shifting or can you not get it out of park?


Flag This
Question Answered: 

Not too sure on that one but may I ask why you are replacing the switch?


Flag This
Question Answered: 

Check your coolant level first. The heater core is generally at the highest point in the system so if coolant is low, the core could be empty. Be sure to check the level before the first start of the day. This will ensure accuracy and safety.


Flag This
Question Answered: 

There is a procedure for resetting the lamp. The lamp is purely mileage based and will come on every 3000 miles. Try this: Instructions 1 Sit in your Chrysler Sebring's driver-side seat. Put the key in, and then turn it to "On/Run." Starting the engine is not required. 2 Push the accelerator pedal to the floor three times; be sure to do this fairly quickly (within 10 seconds). 3 Turn the key to "Lock" and remove it. Re-insert it, and then start the engine. Verify that the oil message is gone. Read more: http://www.ehow.com/how_6953980_reset-message-light-chrysler-sebring.html#ixzz2hfVZYWqw


Flag This
Question Answered: 

Two fuse boxes. One under the hood, left side and one above your left foot in the cabin. The brakelights however do not have separate fuses. Probably just the bulb. I believe it is a 3057 or 3157 dual filament bulb and you must remove the lamp assembly from the car to replace it. You will need a torx bit screw driver for the job.


Flag This
Question Answered: 

You need to get this looked at ASAP. Sounds like you have a fuel leak under the hood such as a ruptured fuel line. Obviously, if you are leaking fuel, your mileage will suffer. You smell it with the heater because the intake for the heater is right behind the hood and in front of the windshield and heat usually pulls air from outside unless set to recirc. A/C on max will use recirculated air automatically which is why you don't smell it then. But seriously, get this thing to a mechanic before it decides to burn to the ground.


Flag This
Answer Ranks