2001 Hyundai Elantra Q&A

2001 Hyundai Elantra Question: Transmission/Shifting problems

Ive taken excellent care of my car. I love her to pieces! But lately, I want to drive her off a cliff! It happened out of no where. I was driving home when all of a sudden, the car POPPED into gear (very hard) and the check engine light when on. I drove home slow and the car was very rough. When I turned it off and back on later, the light was off. But once I started driving again, it would pop into gear hard again, and the CE light would turn back on immediately. This happened most of the time while driving for about 4 days. Now today, I tried to drive and the car wouldnt shift. Going only 20 mph, the rpm's were up to almost 4. I didnt want to push the car to make it shift in fear for what would happen. Is my tranny shot?? I cant drive it to a place for a diagnostics! -
Answer 1
Sounds like a similar situation to the one I'm in. The problem appears to be the input and output speed sensors. Which tell the transmission when to shift. You should be able to pull off a do it yourself repair for under 100 mine cost about 70 the pair and toook care of the problem. -
Comment 1
Where is the Input sensor. I found th output. sits right on top. Can't find the input sensor. 2004 Elantra -
Answer 2
I am having just about the same problem. My problem is when I push on the gas at around 20 mph the rpm's will rev up to 4-5 yet the car will not go any faster and will not shift into second gear. I have found that if I come to a compleat stop it some times helps. I have been told it was my speed sensor and my transmission needs to be flushed and changed. What have you heard? or what have you done to fix the problem? -
Answer 3
Hard shifting 2001 Hyundai Elantra fixed, by replacing both speed sensors. Total cost, $53. Full story follows. My 2001 Hyundai Elantra had the very same problem. Hard often eratic shifting. It would sometimes clank hard, into gear. Sometimes it wouldn't even shift, hanging on till about as high in RPM's as I dared to push it. Being an automatic transmission, in this day and age kept me from being even the slightest bit confident that I could repair it. Due to my current financial situation coupled with the short daily drive time, I put up with this for quite a few months. Finally it came time for vacation and I knew the vehicle needed to be fixed. I did a bit of online research and kept seeing the same bits of information regarding the input and output speed sensors. My son looked up the price of those two parts, online and found them for $53, with free shipping. We watched a few videos to figure out if we dared try, and quickly became comfortable with the prospect. $53 less and a few days later, the pair of sensors came in the mail. The videos we'd watched weren't spot on, partly due to the vehicle in the video being of a later model. Looking at the connector for the switch, removing the air filter cover and housing, and carefully searching for two similar connections, made it easy to determine what had to happen. We had to clip one support of a wiring harness and remove the bracket of another, to remove another bracket. That easily covered both parts. You can't get them mixed up, because the connectors are easily identifiably different, in that one goes one way and the other goes the opposite direction. Pay close attention to cleaning the area above and around each sensor, before you remove them. You don't want to knock any dirt or contamination into your gearbox. The total time for the job, (not counting 4 or 5 ten minute videos, was about an hour.) I didn't have to watch a video while doing the changing, because I already knew to remove the housing an to look for some things possibly in the way. Going off that basic knowledge I just proceeded slowly and with methodic care. I did not go beyond what I felt comfortable doing. (The shops I went to expected the total cost to be $200 more then the $53 I was in, so there was that incentive to continue.) My son and I replaced the parts and took it to a local parts dealer to get the check engine light reset. After a 15 mile test drive, we felt very comfortable that we'd fixed the problem. No erratic shifting, and no more check engine light. My suggestion is, to anyone with this type of problem, to buy the parts online, for about $55. Take it to your local repair shop and as the what it would cost to put those parts in. If it isn't too much for you, go for it. Those parts from the local parts store were over $75 a piece, $53 as a pair online. At the shop, they wanted to charge even more, plus labor. I'm not a mechanic, but I have fixed many things over the course of my 40+ years. I was pretty confident that I could do the task, but not too confident that it would fix the problem. It did fix the problem and I was only out of an afternoons hour, doing the maintenance as well as a few videos and a test drive. I can honestly say that I feel more silly about not trying to fix it sooner. Worked like a charm and was fairly easy to do. Fixing a car, in this day and age, feels far too awesome to not take that chance. -
Answer 4
I had a similar issue and changed the input speed sensor 2 weeks ago. Now its doing it again. Suggestions? -
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