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1999 Toyota Camry Question: replacing oil pump shaft seal and o-ring seal

 

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Starrich, 2.2L 4 Cylinder, Portland, OR, December 29, 2010, 01:45
 Rookie

How do you replace oil pump shaft seal and o-ring seal ? 1999 Camry 2.2 liter engine, auto transmission Am replacing timing belt and water pump. Do you have to remove the oil pan and the oil pump from the engine in order to replace the oil pump shaft seal and o-ring seal? I have removed the pulley from the oil pump shaft without removing the oil pump from the engine. The engine is supported with a jack under the oil pan in order to remove the right front engine mount. If the oil pump has to be removed from the engine, how can I support the engine? Temporarily replace the right engine mount? I don't have an engine hoist. Thanks

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  • Answer #1

    Pvt-Public December 29, 2010, 06:40
    Profile_thumbnail
     Master

    Go to www.toyotanation.com they discuss everything Toyota and have some really knowledgeable folks. The other thing is to get a FSM (factory service manual) the folks of toyota nation can help you with that too.

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  • Medium-star Best Answer
    plysobey February 13, 2014, 11:36
     Enthusiast


    You can do the oil pump gasket without taking off the top half of the timing belt cover or disturbing the timing of the camshaft. You need to take off the alternator belt by loosening the alternator adjusting bolt and swinging it down but if the adjuster screw is frozen just take out the through bolt and leave the adjuster setting alone. Loosen the power steering adjustment screw and pull down on the belt to swing the pump down to remove the belt. Remove the harmonic balancer using a strap wrench or pulley belt wrench to hold the crankshaft from turning. The balancer should come right off the crankshaft. Remove the three bolts from the lower timing belt cover and the 10mm bolt below the alternator that goes through both the top and bottom timing belt covers. You can then remove the lower timing belt cover by prying and wiggling it free but some of the retaining sleeves may be rusted and need a little wd40 and jostling to get the cover free. Mark the position of the timing belt with respect to the crankshaft using whiteout or paint but remove the guide washer first from the crankshaft. You can then remove the lower idler/guide pulley and slide the timing belt off of the oil pump and swing it towards the front of the car and out of the way of the oil pump. Remove the seven 10mm bolts securing the oil pump cover and remember the locations of the two shorter bolts for proper reinstallation. Carefully use a screwdriver to free the oil pump cover from the oil pump body and remove all of the old o-ring gasket. You can change the oil pump seal at your workbench but I didn't change mine because the nut on the oil pump shaft is on pretty tight and I didn't want to chance mangling the belt sprocket using a vise to hold it from turning. Chances are that the o-ring is the real culprit of your major oil leak. When reinstalling the o-ring gasket I used some quality rtv silicone lightly rubbed on the o-ring to hold it in the proper channel on the oil pump body when putting the oil pump cover back on. Do not overtighten the 10mm bolts on the oil pump housing so you don't crack the aluminum oil pump cover or the housing. Reinstall the timing belt on the crankshaft and the oil pump and then replace the idler pulley and check that your timing belt marks match up. Replacing the lower timing belt cover is a little challenging but can be done with patience. The top of the lower cover slides in under the bottom edge of the top timing belt cover and you can see if you have the proper positioning by looking down from above in the engine compartment. Use a long screwdriver or tire iron to lever the power steering pump back into position with the belt installed and also get the alternator back into position using a temporary bolt threaded into the alternator from the left side and a long screwdriver as a lever to get the proper positioning for the adjuster through bolt to be reinstalled. I hope this helps with your project.

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    NoAntidote4U, April 11, 2014, 10:59
     Rookie

    That is the exact information I have been looking for! Thank you so much!

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