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2001 Toyota Camry Question: replaceing timing belt on 2001 with 67000 miles

 

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Visitor, Kearny, NJ, October 13, 2010, 07:29

should i replace the belt or is there a mileage i should hit before doing it or have i reached the mileage now

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  • Answer #1

    ZeeTech October 13, 2010, 09:01
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     Master

    The replacement interval is 90,000 miles or 72 months, whichever comes first.
    The good thing is these are non-interference engines, which means no piston to valve contacts in the event of timing belt failure - it doesn't mean you should ignore it.
    Did you get the 60K miles service done?

    Zee

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  • Answer #2

    Visitor, February 20, 2011, 10:31

    Is that the same as "serpentine belt"? Anyhoo, I replace serp. belt at about 92000 miles. I believe it's "supposed" to be replace around 70 or 80000. Now it's at 160,000 and couple mos. ago I had timing belt replaced again. Thing is...you get no warning when it's about to go out! You could be stranded in the middle of nowhere and...KABOOM! Everything in the engine depends on that belt, so when it goes, everything goes... according to what my Daddy tells me. And he was a mechanic in the Air Force for 20 years :) He knows cars inside and out! Love that man!

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    ZeeTech, February 20, 2011, 18:05
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     Master

    Serpentine belt is not the same as the timing belt. The timing belt is is the synchronizer belt between the crank and can shafts, it could also drive water pump, oil pump, balancer shaft. They are usually covered (protected from foreign materials) and you can't see them in normal operating conditions.
    The serpentine belt is for the accessories, like alternator, power steering, A/C compressor, water pump and you can see the belt since it's not covered.
    There are 2 type of engine INTERFERENCE and FREEWHEELING.
    At the interference engine piston to valve damage occurs in case of a timing belt failure, because they share a space in the combustion chamber, meanwhile at the freewheeling engine the pistons won't reach the valves - even with a broken or wrongly installed timing belt.

    Zee

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