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1993 Honda Accord Question: removal of retractable/auto-lock rear seatbelt

 

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cmm, 2.2L 4 Cylinder, Charlotte, NC, November 01, 2010, 18:19
 Rookie

I need a detailed description of how to remove the interior plastic cover to access the belt mechanism for inspection (the belts no longer retract) and /or replacement.

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  • Answer #1

    patrick mannion from Greg Solow's Engine Room, November 01, 2010, 21:35
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     Master

    It's probably not safe to tamper with or try to repair the seat belt ratcheting mechanism, you may have to resort to buying the belts new or trying to get a good "belt" form a wrecking yard. When trying to locate or find second hand parts, the best way post a request to many wrecking yards at the same time is to Google the words "wrecking yard parts" or "used auto parts" if you want to be a little more specific enter the manufacturer of your vehicle example "Honda used parts". May links appear that allow you to enter the details of your vehicle and the parts you are looking for. This request is then sent out to thousands of wrecking yards through out the country and they then send you an email or give you a call with the price and availability of the part. it is the wrecking yard that pays a small commission for the service.

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    Visitor, November 03, 2010, 04:47

    Thanks for the suggestions on finding used parts from wrecking yards - that will be very helpful if I need to replace the belts. I was not planning to tamper with or repair the seat belt ratcheting mechanism - I only want to access (expose) it, so that I can see if there is something (like a coin) that may be keeping it from retracting. The difficulty I am having as a rookie is knowing what parts of the interior need to be removed (and how to remove them carefully) to expose the ratcheting mechanism. I figured out how to remove the side upholstery piece (between the back seat and the door. And I figured out how to remove the plastic piece covering part of the interior of the rear wheel well - which exposed one screw connection for the plastic piece that appears to cover the ratcheting mechanism. But there are other "hidden" connections holding this plastic piece in place that I do not know how to expose. Do I need to remove the rear panel behind the rear seat that the speakers are attached to, or something else to access the screws to remove the plastic cover? Thanks for any help here.

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  • Answer #2

    November 01, 2010, 22:07
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     Master

    I urge you to contact your local Honda dealer. This is because Seat Belts have a lifetime warranty with Honda. I was surprised to learn as Service Director of a Honda store (after years with other manufacturers) that even many of the parts of the automatic safety belts that retract also have a lifetime warranty. This could save you $1,000 or more. Worth asking, and if no luck at the dealership, contact American Honda's 800 number. Start at the dealership, though, as they are the best resource. Good luck and let us know how you fare!

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    Visitor, November 03, 2010, 04:57

    Thanks for the information on the lifetime warranty on the belts! I definitely plan to take the car to a Honda dealer once I can access the ratcheting mechanism for the rear belts to see if there is anything affecting their operation. And, if there is a coin or something else that is affecting operation that I can simply remove and free up the operation, I have saved $100 labor fee from the dealer - because that simple "fix" is not covered under warranty. Thanks again for your information!

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    DaveJHM, November 03, 2010, 12:02
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    Good luck - I can understand your desire to get in there and have a look; i'm pretty sure the mechanisms are fairly secure, not like a seat belt buckle where a penny could easily get in, and often does.

    My concern is that by tampering with it, you may invalidate any opportunity to have warranty coverage. Something could become physically damage and cause questions as to how it happened and cause coverage issues. From a warranty administration standpoint, it is more cut and dry if a failed part is still intact.

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