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Volkswagen Passat Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Volkswagen Passat based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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35
Known Problems

The 2006-2008 Volkswagen Passat with the 2.0T FSI engine looses power if the turbocharging system has a leak. The most common turbo boost leak is a torn rubber diaphragm on the diverter valve, which is intended to open only if pressure gets too high. Common symptoms are increased turbo noise when letting off of the gas pedal, and power loss.

If there is a turbocharging system leak, the system will need to be inspected, and the defective seals and/or valve will require replacement. 

The flywheel for the 2006-2008 Volkswagen Passat with the 2.0L Turbo engine is a non-conventional "Dual Mass" flywheel. It is known to make light rattling noise when the engine is cold, and should subside once the engine temperature raises. If the rattle doesn't go away when the engine warms, the flywheel may have failed.

If the dual mass flywheel has failed, the only solution is to replace the flywheel.

Reverse gear failures and noise in the manual transmission models are common.

The water pump and/or other cooling system may develop a coolant leak. Oil leaking from the  valve cover gasket is also common.

Ignition wire breakdown is common, resulting in misfires.

Our technicians recommend having the constant velocity (CV) boots and CV joints inspected at each service. Servicing torn CV boots early can prevent the need to replace the CV half shaft or CV joint.

A damaged water pump impeller may cause an engine overheating condition. Our technicians tell us the repair should include replacement of the water pump, thermostat, and flushing the cooling system.

The parking brake may not operate correctly. The correction involves addressing any stored anti-lock brake system (ABS) fault codes, replacing the rear brake pads if required, and following the basic settings procedure as per the scan tool. Our technicians tell us these procedures must be performed in the correct order for the parking brake to function correctly.

Premature wear in various multi-link suspension components can cause noises that are difficult to diagnose. Worn suspension parts can also cause uneven tire wear and create steering alignment problems.

One or both head lights may not work due to premature head light bulb burnout and/or bulb harness failure. Care should be taken to inspect the head light harness connector for damage when replacing bulbs. Damaged connectors should be replaced.

A coolant leak may develop after oil filter replacement. The coolant o-ring seal can be damaged if the oil filter housing turns when removing or installing the oil filter. The recommended procedure is to hold the filter housing when tightening or loosening the oil filter.

Because of issues with the glow plugs and/or the glow plug wiring harness from the control relay, the Check Engine Light may illuminate.

    Throttle body failure is not uncommon and can lead to shifting issues with the automatic transmission and other drivability concerns.

    To ensure longevity of the engine, our technicians recommend to follow the maintenance schedule for the timing belt.