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Volkswagen Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 26 Volkswagen models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

2.0L turbo charged engines may develop a hesitation on acceleration and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light due to a failed high pressure fuel pump or a worn camshaft follower or camshaft. To help prevent this issue from occurring, the cam follower should be inspected every 10,000 - 15,000 miles. The camshaft lobe pushes on the follower to operate the high pressure fuel pump. 

To correct this issue one or all of the following will need replacement: the camshaft, high-pressure fuel pump, and/or the cam follower.

 

The Check Engine Light may illuminate because of evaporative (EVAP) emission failures and/or intake manifold vacuum leaks.

Condensation may develop in the heater case which can cause a musty odor from the heating, ventilation and AC (HVAC) system.  Our technicians tell us a cleaner is available for the heater case. Also, the drain system should be checked for debris.

A damaged water pump impeller may cause an engine overheating condition. Our technicians tell us the repair should include replacement of the water pump, thermostat, and flushing the cooling system.

Erratic turn signal operation can be a result of a failing turn signal flasher relay which will require replacement.

Condensation in the heater case may cause a musty odor from the heating, ventilation and AC (HVAC) system after sitting for two hours or more. Our technicians tell us that a cleaner is available for the heater case and the drain system should be checked for debris.

A dirty or failed throttle body can cause various drivability issues and illumination of the Check Engine Light.

The anti-lock brake system (ABS) control module may fail causing the ABS light to illuminate. Failed modules should be replaced to restore ABS operation.

One or both head lights may not work due to premature head light bulb burnout and/or bulb harness failure. Care should be taken to inspect the head light harness connector for damage when replacing bulbs. Damaged connectors should be replaced.

Clogged sunroof drains can allow water to enter the interior and accumulate under the carpet where various control modules are mounted. Over time, the accumulated moisture can damage the control modules.

2.0L turbo charged engines may develop a hesitation on acceleration and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light due to a failed high pressure fuel pump or a worn camshaft follower or camshaft. To help prevent this issue from occurring, the cam follower should be inspected every 10,000 - 15,000 miles. The camshaft lobe pushes on the follower to operate the high pressure fuel pump. 

To correct this issue one or all of the following will need replacement: the camshaft, high-pressure fuel pump, and/or the cam follower.

 

This engine (2.0L FSI) uses direct injection which requires very high fuel pressure. This high fuel pressure is achieved by using a high pressure mechanical fuel pump (HPFP) that is driven off of the camshaft.

The HPFP may fail due to damage from a camshaft manufacturing defect. The defect causes abnormal wear of the mechanical barrier between the camshaft and the fuel pump. This barrier, the cam follower, will wear down and cause failure of the camshaft and the HPFP.

Symptoms include illumination of the check engine light, engine running roughly, and loss of power. Engine codes associated may be P0300, P0301, P0302, P0303, P0304, P0087, P1093 and P2293.

To correct this issue one or all of the following will need replacement: the camshaft, high-pressure fuel pump, and/or the cam follower.

To help prevent this issue from occurring, the cam follower should be inspected every 10,000 - 15,000 miles. 

Shifting issues due to internal problems in high mileage automatic transmissions can be difficult to resolve without transmission replacement.

The water pump and/or other cooling system may develop a coolant leak. Oil leaking from the  valve cover gasket is also common.