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Volkswagen Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 26 Volkswagen models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

The Volkswagen Eos uses the FSI and TSI direct injection engines. These engines are subject to carbon buildup in the intake system which can cause power loss, OBD codes and a check engine light, and a rough idle. In normal engines, the engine is cleaned by the gasoline flowing through the injectors and into the intake system, however, since the Eos uses direct injection, gasoline does not flow through common carbon buildup areas. 

 Possible trouble codes include: P0300P0301P0302P0303P0304.

The solution is to remove the intake manifold and professionally clean the intake manifold, intake ports on the cylinder head, and the intake valves. This may need to be done in as few as 20,000 miles. 

The water pump and/or other cooling system may develop a coolant leak. Oil leaking from the  valve cover gasket is also common.

The anti-lock brake system (ABS) control module may fail causing the ABS light to illuminate. Failed modules should be replaced to restore ABS operation.

The Volkswagen Tiguan uses the TSI direct injection engine. This engine is subject to carbon buildup in the intake system which can cause power loss, OBD codes and a check engine light, and a rough idle. In normal engines, the engine is cleaned by the gasoline flowing through the injectors and into the intake system, however, since the Tiguan uses direct injection, gasoline does not flow through common carbon buildup areas. 

Possible trouble codes include: P0300P0301P0302P0303P0304.

The solution is to remove the intake manifold and professionally clean the intake manifold, intake ports on the cylinder head, and the intake valves. This may need to be done in as few as 20,000 miles. 

Shifting issues due to internal problems in high mileage automatic transmissions can be difficult to resolve without transmission replacement.

2.0L turbo charged engines may develop a hesitation on acceleration and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light due to a failed high pressure fuel pump or a worn camshaft follower or camshaft. To help prevent this issue from occurring, the cam follower should be inspected every 10,000 - 15,000 miles. The camshaft lobe pushes on the follower to operate the high pressure fuel pump. 

To correct this issue one or all of the following will need replacement: the camshaft, high-pressure fuel pump, and/or the cam follower.

 

Oil and carbon tend to build up, creating restrictions in the intake manifold. Symptoms will be loss of power (sometimes severe) and poor fuel economy.

2.0L turbo charged engines may develop a hesitation on acceleration and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light due to a failed high pressure fuel pump or a worn camshaft follower or camshaft. To help prevent this issue from occurring, the cam follower should be inspected every 10,000 - 15,000 miles. The camshaft lobe pushes on the follower to operate the high pressure fuel pump. 

To correct this issue one or all of the following will need replacement: the camshaft, high-pressure fuel pump, and/or the cam follower.

 

The mass air flow (MAF) sensor may fail, resulting in drivability issues and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light.

The digital display portion of the instrument cluster may fail. Our technicians tell us the entire instrument cluster will need to be replaced to correct this concern.

There have been several reported instances of carbon build-up in Volkswagen direct-injection motors. Use of premium fuel is recommended, along with allowing the vehicle to fully warm up during drives.

Severe carbon build-up can cause several issues such as rough cold idle, hard starts, decreased acceleration, misfires, black clouds under hard acceleration, and the illumination of the check engine light.

Repair of this condition once severe requires the physical cleaning of the intake manifold and intake ports on the head. Due to its time consuming nature, this repair can be expensive.

One or both head lights may not work due to premature head light bulb burnout and/or bulb harness failure. Care should be taken to inspect the head light harness connector for damage when replacing bulbs. Damaged connectors should be replaced.

Shifting issues due to internal problems in high mileage automatic transmissions can be difficult to resolve without transmission replacement.

Shifting issues due to internal problems in high mileage automatic transmissions can be difficult to resolve without transmission replacement.