Toyota Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Toyota as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

At higher mileages (125,000+) the Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor may intermittently stop working, especially when the vehicle is fully warmed up. This can cause the engine to stall unexpectedly.

Drivers of the Toyota Corolla may notice excessive oil consumption between oil changes, even to the extent of the engine oil warning light displayed on the multi-function display.

This issue is known to be caused by infrequent oil changes causing engine sludge, or worn piston rings. 

The engine should be cleaned of oil sludge, and if oil consumption remains excessive, the engine may need new piston rings, or other internal components replaced. 

To avoid this issue, change the engine oil and filter every 3,000 miles, and ensure the proper grade of oil is used. 

The Check Engine Light may illuminate due to an evaporative emission (EVAP) system fault. Our technicians tell us these EVAP system faults can be difficult to diagnose but it is not uncommon to find a failed charcoal canister or a loose or worn gas cap.

If the engine will not crank over, the most common problem is the starter. These will tend to go out at about 100,00-125,000 miles. Sometimes it is only the starter solenoid, but often the complete starter (including solenoid) needs to be replaced.

In some vehicles, the automatic transmissions over heat light may come with sustained highway driving or driving at a sustained speed. Our technicians tell us that flushing the transmission and changing from Dextron lll to Dextron ll can help remedy this problem.

The center multi-function display may failure. This is commonly caused by poorly soldered internal connection. Our technicians tell us that these display panels can be successfully repaired or reconditioned by a shop specializing in such repairs.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate because a component of the oxygen sensor stops working. As a result the engine computer is unable to determine the proper ratio of air to fuel for the engine. Replacing the failed oxygen sensor should correct this concern.

Toyota also issued a recall on the seat belts because of a faulty buckle status switch. The seat belt status switch can be replaced under the recall.

The ignition coil inside the distributor may fail. Our technicians tell us this may result in a hesitation on acceleration, especially when the vehicle is warming up on cold, rainy days. The pickup coils inside the distributor can also fail and cause a no-start condition. There have also been some failures of the radio noise suppressors inside the distributors, which can short out. Our technicians recommend replacing the whole distributor with a complete, genuine Toyota distributor if any of its components fail.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate because a component of the oxygen sensor stops working. As a result the engine computer is unable to determine the proper ratio of air to fuel for the engine. Replacing the failed oxygen sensor should correct this concern.

 

The Check Engine Light may illuminate due to an evaporative emission (EVAP) system fault. Our technicians tell us these EVAP system faults can be difficult to diagnose but it is not uncommon to find a failed charcoal canister or a loose or worn gas cap.

The fuel gauge may read incorrectly. A service bulletin has been released by Toyota regarding this concern. The fuel filler pipe or the instrument cluster may need to be replaced to correct this concern.

Corrosion protection for the frame of the 2000-2003 Toyota Tundra is insufficient for the rear crossmember, under the truck bed. The crossmember is designed for chassis rigidity, truck bed support, and mounting for other components. When the crossmember rusts through there is a loss of rigidity, and can be metal-on-metal vibration from the truck bed. 

Toyota has addressed the issue by applying a new coating to the rear of the frame when this issue arises. If deep rusting is present, the crossmember must be replaced. 

Proper cleaning of the frame, especially in locations where road salts are used, can help protect the coating.