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Toyota Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 34 Toyota models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

Models with electric sliding doors can develop problems with the door mechanism. The cable in the door becomes frayed, which will damage the electric motor.

The fuel gauge may read incorrectly. Our technicians tell us there is a recalibration procedure which should be performed to correct this issue.

At higher mileages, (125,000-150,000) the automatic transmission may not shift correctly. This can be caused by the throttle position sensor being out of adjustment or a shift solenoid needing to be replaced. Typically the transmission does not need to be completely overhauled.

At higher mileages (125,000+) the Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor may intermittently stop working, especially when the vehicle is fully warmed up. This can cause the engine to stall unexpectedly.

Drivers may hear a loud noise, much like a vacuum cleaner, coming from their engine on cold starts. This affects the 2005-2009 Toyota Sequoia iForce V8 models. 

The noise is from the secondary air pump, which sends hot air to the catalytic converter when the engine is cold. This allows the catalytic converter to clean exhaust better, and lower emissions while the engine is warming up.

Pump failure may result in:

Fixing the issue involves removal of the intake manifold, and replacement of the secondary air pump.

Intermittent failure of a purge control valve in the evaporative emission system can cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate. A failed valve should be replaced to correct this problem.

 

Cars equipped with an automatic transmission might experience a hesitation when accelerating. Revised software for the on board computer is available which may correct this problem. Software revisions are commonly most helpful on newer vehicles. once the mileage builds up a worn component could cause similar problems. Whenever major transmission work in performed, the transmission software should be updated as necessary.

On higher mileage vehicles, an engine misfire may develop and/or the Check Engine Light may illuminate due to a failed ignition coil. It is not uncommon to replace all the coils when the first one fails in order to prevent return trips to the repair shop.

On higher mileage vehicles, an engine misfire may develop and/or the Check Engine Light may illuminate due to a failed ignition coil. It is not uncommon to replace all the coils when the first one fails in order to prevent return trips to the repair shop.

One or more oxygen sensors may fail resulting in illumination of the Check Engine Light.

The 6 cylinder engines have a tendency to leak oil from the valve cover gaskets, especially the one near the firewall.

When changing the air filter, it is easy to knock off a hose on the air filter housing, which is part of the emission control system. If the vehicle is driven with this hose disconnected, the Check Engine Light will illuminate.

At higher mileages, (125,000-150,000) the automatic transmission may not shift correctly. This can be caused by the throttle position sensor being out of adjustment or a shift solenoid needing to be replaced. Typically the transmission does not need to be completely overhauled.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate because a component of the oxygen sensor stops working. As a result the engine computer is unable to determine the proper ratio of air to fuel for the engine. Replacing the failed oxygen sensor should correct this concern.