Mercedes-Benz 560SEL Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Mercedes-Benz 560SEL as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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25
Known Problems

As brake fluid becomes dirty over time, it can cause a failure of the anti-lock brake system (ABS) modulator assembly. Our technicians recommend a complete brake system flush every two years to help prevent this issue.

The brakes may begin to squeak at about the 50 percent wear point. This is due to the size and material used for the brake pads and rotors.  The brake rotor surfaces become uneven, causing a lip to form at the outer edge. This will generally require replacement of the rotors when the pads are worn (pad life varies depending on driving style and terrain).

The climate control system can fail or perform erratically due to internal problems with the climate control button electrical contacts. Replacement of the climate control assembly is commonly required to correct this problem.

It is not uncommon for the idle air compensator to get stuck in one position, resulting in the engine idle speed (rpm) being too high or too low. Replacement of the failed compensator may be necessary to correct this concern.

A worn steering dampening shock can cause a fluid leak at the front of the vehicle. If a leak is noted from the dampening shock, our technicians tell us that it should be replaced.

The instrument cluster, along with the turn signal and wiper combination switch, can fail.

The bushings for the shifter lever wear out to the point where they break and fall out. This causes excessive movement (loose feel) in the shifter lever and a clanging-type noise when changing gears.

On high mileage vehicles, rear spring wear may cause the rear end to sag.

The rubber boot connecting the throttle body to the intake manifold tends to crack. This can cause hard starting, rough or erratic idle, and engine performance problems.

Internal leaks and a stuck level control valve can cause problems with the load leveling suspension in the rear; the vehicle may ride harshly.