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Mercedes-Benz Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 165 Mercedes-Benz models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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2,814
Known Problems

The ESP and BAS warning lights may illuminate due to a failed brake light switch. Replacement of the failed switch should correct this concern.

Motor mounts commonly fail, causing engine vibrations to be transferred to the body. Failed motor mounts should be replaced in order to prevent damage to the transmission mount.

A rear tail light housing can fail causing the brake light on the affected side to be inoperative. Replacing the failed housing is commonly required to correct this issue.

The camshaft adjuster solenoid (which is related to the variable valve timing system) may fail or timing chain/balance shaft components may wear, resulting in illumination of the Check Engine Light and various drivability issues. Mercedes-Benz has released a service bulletin outlining specific repair instructions depending on fault codes stored.

The interior wood trim and dash pad are likely to crack due to age and sun exposure.

The relay which turns the airmatic suspension pump on may fail causing the pump to run continuously. This can result in failure of the pump motor or a dead battery as the pump motor will continue to run after the car is turned off. Also, Worn airmatic pump mount bushings can causes noises in the front axle while driving on bumpy roads or a buzzing noise while the pump is running.

Vehicles equipped with a 7-speed automatic transmission may develop a rough shifting condition, most commonly going up from first to second gear and going down from third to second or second to first gear. Our technicians tell us this is due to an internal component failure. Mercedes has released updated parts; the transmission will need to be removed and disassembled to complete the necessary repairs.

The ESP and BAS warning lights may illuminate due to a failed brake light switch. Replacement of the failed switch should correct this concern.

A repetitive clicking noise from behind the center area of the dash panel is usually caused by a broken stepper motor actuating arm. The actuating arm controls the direction of air flow in the climate control system. Disassembly of the center console will be required to access and change the broken arm with the updated, reinforced part.

The power steering return hose may leak at the radiator cooler fitting. If the clamp is not properly tightened, the hose can blow off, causing increased steering effort and a mess under the hood.

The engine may develop a stalling and/or no start condition due to a failed crankshaft position sensor.

The CD changer may suffer from an internal mechanical problem. Replacement of the faulty unit is generally required to correct this issue.

The evaporator temperature sensor can fail, causing the AC compressor not to cycle. If the AC compressor does not turn on, the AC system will not blow cold air. If the compressor is stuck on, the air will be very cold at first, before warming up.

A dead battery can be caused by a faulty seat control module that does not properly shut down.  Spilling liquids on the front seats can cause these modules to fail.

The camshaft adjuster solenoid (which is related to the variable valve timing system) may fail or timing chain/balance shaft components may wear, resulting in illumination of the Check Engine Light and various drivability issues. Mercedes-Benz has released a service bulletin outlining specific repair instructions depending on fault codes stored.