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Mercedes-Benz Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 165 Mercedes-Benz models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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2,814
Known Problems

Vehicles equipped with a 7-speed automatic transmission may develop a rough shifting condition, most commonly going up from first to second gear and going down from third to second or second to first gear. Our technicians tell us this is due to an internal component failure. Mercedes has released updated parts; the transmission will need to be removed and disassembled to complete the necessary repairs.

The heating, ventilation and AC (HVAC) heater box is susceptible to mildew buildup. This can result in a musty odor from the HVAC system, most noticeable when the system is first turned on.

Vehicles equipped with a 7-speed automatic transmission may develop a rough shifting condition, most commonly going up from first to second gear and going down from third to second or second to first gear. Our technicians tell us this is due to an internal component failure. Mercedes has released updated parts; the transmission will need to be removed and disassembled to complete the necessary repairs.

A no start condition may develop due to an anti-theft system fault. If the drive authorization module fails to recognize the keys, the engine will not start. In many cases, a new module and keys will be needed to correct this problem.

High mileage or older vehicles commonly develop leaks from the differential seals and/or cover. Our technicians recommend a complete reseal of the differential unit whenever these leaks are repaired.

The door for the vanity mirror (or the frame for the door) can break; due to a redesign, the mirror "cassette" will need replacement.

The lower control arm bushings can wear and crack, leading to irregular and premature tire wear. Worn Ball joints can also cause similar tire wear problems. I some cases it may be necessary to replace the lower control arm, including bushings & ball joint to correct this concern.

The crankshaft position sensor may fail. Symptoms of this are: The engine will crank—but not start—especially when the engine is warm. The car may start again if it is left to cool off, but it may run roughly or have poor performance.

Due to wear, high usage vehicles can experience ignition lock and tumbler failures. The ignition lock cylinder will generally require replacement to correct this concern.

Poor AC performance may be caused by a refrigerant leak from the hose that connects the receiver drier to the AC condenser.

One or more blend door vacuum actuators may fail resulting in the incorrect output temperature from the HVAC system. Failed actuators will require replacement to restore proper HVAC operation.

High mileage vehicles may develop a leak from one or more of the transmission oil seals.

Going over large bumps in convertible models may cause the roll bar to deploy, rendering the roof inoperative. Special tools are generally required to return the roll bar to its stowed position.

The camshaft adjuster solenoid (which is related to the variable valve timing system) may fail or timing chain/balance shaft components may wear, resulting in illumination of the Check Engine Light and various drivability issues. Mercedes-Benz has released a service bulletin outlining specific repair instructions depending on fault codes stored.