Mazda Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Mazda as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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163
Known Problems

The engine may fail to start due to an electrically shorted sensor. Some of the sensors may internally short and not blow any fuses. A technician may find no spark and no operation of the fuel injectors in the diagnosis. One way a technician may isolate the defective sensor is by disconnecting sensors one by one to see if the engine starts.

A low speed stall when the throttle pedal is slightly pressed and released may mean the Engine Control Module (ECM) needs to be reflashed (updated).

The rear brakes can squeak because the rear brake pad may be contacting the brake rotor. A burr on the backing plate of the brake pad can prevent the pad from seating in the bracket properly causing the contact with the rotor. The backing plate and the pad support hardware can be deburred in the contact areas. Mazda has also released revised brake pads.

A chirping or squeaking noise may be noted from the front of the vehicle when traversing bumps at low speeds. Our technicians tell us this type of noise is generally caused by the front strut mounts which will require replacement.

A chirping or squeaking noise may be noted from the front of the vehicle when traversing bumps at low speeds. Our technicians tell us this type of noise is generally caused by the front strut mounts which will require replacement.

The engine may develop a crank no start condition due to a faulty ignition switch. The ignition switch will require replacement to correct this concern.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate with a stored code P2006. This is most often caused by a sticking intake manifold runner control (IMRC) valve. Our technicians tell us that depending on your vehicle the valve may require replacement and/or the powertrain control module (PCM) software will require upgrading.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate with a stored code P2006. This is most often caused by a sticking intake manifold runner control (IMRC) valve. Our technicians tell us that depending on your vehicle the valve may require replacement and/or the powertrain control module (PCM) software will require upgrading.

A dirty, or contaminated mass airflow sensor (MAF) can cause the engine to run poorly. The Check Engine Light may or may not illuminate.  MAF sensor related fault codes P0102 and/or P0103 may be stored. In some cases, carefully cleaning the sensor element will fix the problem. If not, replacement of the sensor may be required.

Some vehicles may experience Check Engine Light illumination with a trouble code indicating the thermostat is stuck open. The thermostat will need to be replaced with a modified one and there is a software update for the Powertrain Control Module (PCM).

If the engine is misfiring, it may be caused by a damaged wire(s) which connect the fuel injectors to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). The damaged wire(s) can be repaired or the emission wire harness replaced. A misfire can result in a loss of engine performance and illumination of the Check Engine Light.

The DPFE (differential pressure feedback EGR) sensor tends to fail. The DPFE sensor monitors function of the EGR valve by measuring pressure changes in the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. Symptoms of a failing DPFE sensor are hesitation or stumbling when driving along with illumination of the Check Engine Light.

Some vehicles may experience Check Engine Light illumination with a trouble code indicating the thermostat is stuck open. The thermostat will need to be replaced with a modified one and there is a software update for the Powertrain Control Module (PCM).