Lincoln Problem Reports

Most Reported Lincoln Problem Reports

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A cosmetic crack may develop on the plastic liftgate trim panel. Lincoln has released a service procedure to replace the applique without damage the the liftgate glass.

Sagging suspension can be a result of air suspension struts and/or drier leaking air. These type of air leaks can lead to failure of the air suspension compressor.

The composite (plastic) intake manifold may crack near the thermostat housing and cause a coolant leak. Ford released an updated manifold that was reinforced to prevent a recurrence. No recall was issued for this problem but Ford did extend the warranty to seven years on some models from the date of purchase.

Check the battery cable ends frequently for corrosion. Corrosion can easily migrate under the cable insulation and cause numerous electrical faults and drivability issues.

Erratic engine coolant temperature or intermittent overheating can be caused by corrosion inside the water pump. The impeller may spin on the water pump shaft or the impeller may corrode. Either condition reduces coolant circulation resulting in engine overheating.

 

   A frozen shift lever may be caused by either a bad brake switch or a broken gear lever mechanism. If the switch is bad it will not send the correct signal to allow you to shift. The solution is to replace the switch. If the switch is good, you will most likely have to replace the shift lever mechanism itself.

Prior to jacking or lifting a vehicle with air suspension, you must turn off the suspension switch. The switch is generally located in the trunk or on the right side of the passenger foot well.

Erratic engine coolant temperature or intermittent overheating can be caused by corrosion inside the water pump. The impeller may spin on the water pump shaft or the impeller may corrode. Either condition reduces coolant circulation resulting in engine overheating.

 

Sagging suspension can be a result of air suspension struts and/or drier leaking air. These type of air leaks can lead to failure of the air suspension compressor.

Check the battery cable ends frequently for corrosion. Corrosion can easily migrate under the cable insulation and cause numerous electrical faults and drivability issues.

A vacuum leak from the PCV grommet vacuum leak can cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate. The molded rubber hose connections may crack and collapse, causing the vehicle to run roughly. A damaged PCV hose will require replacement.

Do not use air filters with oil-coated elements. They may cause premature failure of the mass air flow sensor; this is not covered under the warranty.

A fluid leak may be noted from the axle area. Red fluid is from the transmission. Brown fluid is from the power transfer unit (PTU). Leaks are commonly from the axle seal and/or PTU cover seal. Leaking seals should be replaced as necessary.

A squeak or creak noise may be noted when driving over bumps. Our technicians tell us of two possible causes. The lower control arm may have faulty welds or the strut jounce bumper could be rubbing on a dry strut plate. There is a factory repair kit for the lower control arms. If the noise is coming from the strut it may require dis-assembly to lubricate the jounce bumper.

The automatic transmission may develop shifting concerns. On lower mileage vehicles, upgrading the software in the powertrain control module (PCM) and the transmission control module (TCM) may correct the problem. As the mileage increases, internal transmission damage can occur. Repairs could involve replacement of the valve body or a complete transmission rebuild. Whenever major transmission repairs are made, it is important to be sure the PCM and the TCM have the latest software updates to help prevent these issues from reoccurring.