Lincoln Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Lincoln as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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153
Known Problems

Prior to jacking or lifting a vehicle with air suspension, you must turn off the suspension switch. The switch is generally located in the trunk or on the right side of the passenger foot well.

Erratic engine coolant temperature or intermittent overheating can be caused by corrosion inside the water pump. The impeller may spin on the water pump shaft or the impeller may corrode. Either condition reduces coolant circulation resulting in engine overheating.

 

In high dust areas, problems with the EGR system are common. The filter for the EGR solenoid may plug and cause the EGR to activate when it should not; this can cause the engine to stall. The dirty filter should be replaced to correct this concern.

A fluid leak may be noted from the axle area. Red fluid is from the transmission. Brown fluid is from the power transfer unit (PTU). Leaks are commonly from the axle seal and/or PTU cover seal. Leaking seals should be replaced as necessary.

Sagging suspension can be a result of air suspension struts and/or drier leaking air. These type of air leaks can lead to failure of the air suspension compressor.

Various radio performance concerns may develop including noisy operation, no operation, or SYNC issues. Reprogramming the appropriate module with updated software will commonly correct most of these issues.

If you experience poor running and low fuel economy after the starter has been repaired, it could indicate that an incorrect starter relay was used. A diode-suppressed starter relay may be needed.

Corrosion can form at the grounding points near the battery. There may be electrical faults and the engine may crank but not start.

Incorrect cabin temperature can be a result of a broken temperature blend door. Our technicians tell us if this occurs, the complete heater case will need to be replaced.

The composite (plastic) intake manifold may crack near the thermostat housing and cause a coolant leak. Ford released an updated manifold that was reinforced to prevent a recurrence. No recall was issued for this problem but Ford did extend the warranty to seven years on some models from the date of purchase.

There were problems with premature head gasket failure that could cause overheating problems due to coolant loss. A new head gasket design and assembly procedure was released to fix the problem.

The automatic transmission may develop shifting concerns. On lower mileage vehicles, upgrading the software in the powertrain control module (PCM) and the transmission control module (TCM) may correct the problem. As the mileage increases, internal transmission damage can occur. Repairs could involve replacement of the valve body or a complete transmission rebuild. Whenever major transmission repairs are made, it is important to be sure the PCM and the TCM have the latest software updates to help prevent these issues from reoccurring.

Poor fitment of the headliner, which may or may not develop into a rattle noise around the sunroof area is generally caused buy foam isolation blocks becoming detached from the headliner. The repair involves re-securing the foam blocks using cable (zip) ties.

Very hard shifting may be noted after the transmission reaches operating temperature. Most commonly this occurs in the higher gears and reverse. Replacement of the transmission may be recommended to correct this concern.

The Lincoln Navigator with optional automatic temperature control may have a problem with frequent fan speed changes when using the heater or air conditioner. Normally, the fan speed changes only to maintain a selected temperature, but when the fan speed changes frequently and needlessly, there is an issue with the fan speed control unit. 

The fan speed control unit, sometimes erroneously called the blower motor resister, regulates the speed for the blower motor in order to maintain the temperature set by the driver. When it fails, the fan will run at random settings, and the climate control will be inaccurate.

Note: this does not affect the temperature of the air that comes from the vents, it affects the amount of air that comes from the vents. 

The repair is simple, and quick. The control unit is located behind the glove box in most models, and removal and installation takes only minutes.

Also note: this only applies to vehicles with single or dual automatic climate control.