Jeep Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Jeep as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

A squeak noise may be noted when applying or releasing the clutch pedal. Our technicians tell us that lubricating the clutch master cylinder push-rod ball socket should correct the concern.

Our technicians tell us that various dirveability and Check Engine Light issues can be corrected by updating the powertrain control module (PCM) software.

Our technicians tell us that various driveability issues and/or illumination of the check engine or electronic stability program (ESP) warning lights may occur on vehicles with 3.7L V6 and 4.7L V8 engines. A powertrain control module (PCM) software upgrade is available which may correct these issues.

EGR valve position sensor fault code(s) may be stored in the powertrain control module (PCM) resulting in illumination of the Check Engine Light. A PCM software upgrade is available which may correct this issue.

An engine overheating condition may develop due to a coolant flow issue. Our technicians tell us that debris may block the cylinder head coolant port at the primary thermostat housing. Removing the debris should correct this concern.

An abnormal noise and/or vibration may be noted from the front brakes during light braking. Our technicians tell us it may be necessary to replace the steering knuckle and hub assembly, along with resurfacing the rotors to correct this concern.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate with code P0139 and/or P0571. Our technicians tell us the revised powertrain control module (PCM) is available to correct this concern.

The manual transmission may jump out of gear. Our technicians tell us that replacing the 1-2 synchronizer assembly should correct this concern.

The sky slider sunroof may develop a wind noise and/or loss of "express" mode. Our technicians tell us that lubrication the front drive cables, replacing the front header bow, and initializing the sunroof module will generally correct these concerns.

The automatic transmission may stay in "default" mode with no fault codes stored. Reprogramming the powertrain control module (PCM) may be necessary to correct this concern.

The fuel tank may become hard to fill and/or the fuel fill nozzle may shut off repeatedly while fueling. Our technicians tell us that various items including the fuel tank, vapor recirculation tube, fuel fill tube, or EVAP system canister control valve may be at fault. Proper diagnoses will be required to determine the exact cause of this concern.

Vehicles with a 3.7L V6 engine may develop a chirp type noise from the serpentine belt when the steering wheel is at full lock with the engine idling. Our technicians tell us a revised serpentine belt tensioner is available to correct this concern.

The hard drive for the MYGIG radio may become corrupt. Symptoms would include: The radio does not go past the "Navigation is being activated" screen, music on the hard drive cannot be accessed, capacity of the hard drive shows 0. If all three of these symptoms are present the MYGIG radio software will require updating.

Jeep issued an emissions recall in late 2006 to update the powertrain control module (PCM) software on certain 1996 vehicles. As part of the recall, the catalytic converter will also be inspected for damage and replaced as necessary. To see if your vehicle is included in the recall you can visit the Jeep website (owners' section) that allows owners to input their VIN number and check the recalls on their vehicle.