Honda Odyssey Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Honda Odyssey as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems
On certain models the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) can misinterpret data from the coolant sensor and set a false Check Engine light (MIL). A software update from Honda is needed for this repair.

On certain models the Electronic Load Detector (ELD) can cause the head lights to dim and set a Check Engine Light. The ELD will need to be replaced for this repair.

A faulty gasket can cause coolant seepage from the water passage near the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve. Replacing the gasket should correct this coolant leak.

Certain models in colder climates can exhibit a Check Engine light (MIL) when moisture freezes in the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor. Replacing the MAP sensor repairs this issue

A buzzing noise at freeway speeds can be caused by the engine and transmission resonating through the transmission shift cable. The Power Control Module (PCM) must be replaced to stop the resonating noise. 

There is an issue where the transmission can have a torque converter problem, or the computer monitoring the torque converter can misinterpret the information, and in either case this can cause the Check Engine Light (MIL) to illuminate. The problem will need to be diagnosed and depending upon what is causing the issue, the transmission will have to be repaired or the computer replaced.

A refrigerant leak may develop from the AC evaporator causing the AC to blow warm air. Verifying failure of this component is difficult. A good shop will use leak detection dye to verify a failing evaporator.

An AC refrigerant leak may develop from the condenser. Replacing a leaking condenser will be required to restore proper AC operation.

A rear engine mount that is broken can cause an engine vibration felt in the vehicle. Replacing the failed mount will repair this problem.

A rough idle and harsh transmission shift can be caused by a broken front engine mount. Replacing the broken mount will address these issues.

Children feeding coins into the radio's CD slot can cause blown fuses, lights to stay on (both interior and exterior), and can ruin what was once a perfectly good radio.

On certain models the fuel gauge will not read full due to excessive resistance in the sending unit. Replacing the sending unit in the fuel tank will commonly repair this issue.

A chirp noise from the timing belt area can be caused by a tilted idler pulley. Installing a corrective shim from Honda will commonly correct this issue.

Damaged engine mounts can lead to vibration and roughness felt in the steering wheel. A rattle in the dash and engine area may also be heard. Replacement of damaged mounts will commonly correct these issues.

Sulfur deposits on the fuel sending unit can cause the fuel gauge to read inaccurately. Replacing the sending unit will repair this issue.