Honda Civic Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Honda Civic as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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75
Known Problems

On certain models the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) can misinterpret the secondary oxygen sensor data and set a false Check Engine Light. A software update from Honda is needed for this issue.

Cracked exhaust is common on both exhaust manifolds and manifold/catalytic converter combination. Replacing the cracked component will repair the problem.

Leaking tail light gaskets can allow water into the tail light assembly and inside the vehicle. Replacing the tail light gaskets will commonly correct this issue.

The front brake rotors can warp and cause a vibration when braking. The rotors will need to be machined or in cases where they are worn to thin, replaced to correct this issue.

A worn (front) bushing on the rear lower control arm can cause a noise when going over bumps. Replacing the worn bushing should stop the noise.

On certain models the engine RPM does not drop immediately and can cause a surge when driving in first gear. A software update is required for this repair.
On certain models the automatic transmission range switch can fail and cause the Check Engine light (MIL) to illuminate, and the engine may not crank intermittently. Replacing the range switch is needed for this repair.
Some models have an issue where a faulty thermostat does not allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature and because of that the computer will not allow the torque converter to operate in the lock-up mode. Replacing the thermostat will repair this issue.

Impact damage to the front of the vehicle can cause the primary oxygen sensor to blow fuse 15 and cause the Check Engine light (MIL) to come on. In most cases the primary oxygen sensor needs replacing and a new fuse installed to repair the issue.

On certain models poor igniter connections can cause misfires and catalyst deterioration. Cleaning and securing the connections will correct the problem.

Impact damage to the front of the vehicle can cause the primary O2 sensor to blow fuse 15 and cause the Check Engine light (MIL) to come on. In most cases the primary O2 sensor needs replacing and a new fuse installed to repair the issue.