Honda Accord Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Honda Accord as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

The radio and climate control display can go dark on some models. It will be necessary to replace the affected unit to correct this concern. Some customers have reported receiving help from Honda regarding this repair.

The starter motor used on the 1990-1997 Honda Accord V6 frequently fails on vehicles around 125,000 miles.

It may help prolong the life of the starter to service the starter to ensure the connections are clean and tight at the 100,000 mile mark.

The Honda Accord is known for premature alternator bearing failure. The alternator shaft bearing alerts of mechanical failure by making a howling or grinding noise, but other symptoms may appear, including:

  • Battery warning light illumination
  • Engine will not start
  • Engine stalling or hesitation
  • Power steering and A/C failure

    Continued use after the alternator makes these noises generally result in loss of the serpentine belt, power steering, air conditioning and battery power.

    The correction is to replace the alternator immediately.

  • Four cylinder models of the Honda Accord from 1990-2001 have a known issue with ignition distributor shaft bearing failure, which causes:

  • Failure to start 
  • Engine randomly misfires 
  • Check Engine Light Illumination
  • OBD Trouble code(s) P0300, P0301, P0302, P0303, P0304, P1336, P1337 
  • Engine vibrations  
  • Hesitation or stalling 
  • Oil leak from distributor cap 
  • The ignition system uses the distributor to send high voltage electricity to the spark plugs at the right time. It accomplishes this timing mechanically by a shaft, which connects the crankshaft and ignition distributor, so they spin at the same rate. That shaft, part of the distributor, rests in a bearing inside the distributor.This bearing, the distributor shaft bearing, is known for failing, and allowing the shaft to move slightly.

    As the bearing fails, it allows the shaft to move away from the shaft seal, and oil pours into the distributor cap, causing misfires.

    The play in the shaft can also cause contact with the crankshaft position sensor, causing a no start problem.

    Total bearing failure will be most evident from the grinding noise that changes with engine speed, and oil in the ignition distributor cap.

    If the bearing is making noise, driving or running the vehicle can result in catastrophic engine failure.

    To correct this issue, the ignition distributor and shaft must be replaced. Any damage to the crankshaft position sensor will necessitate replacement as well.

     

    The Honda Accord has a known issue with engine oil leaking from the ignition distributor shaft seal.

    Leakage from the shaft seal coats the electrical components of the distributor with engine oil causing:

  • Failure to start 
  • Engine randomly misfires 
  • OBD Trouble code(s) P0300, P0301, P0302, P0303, P0304, P1336, P1337 
  • Engine vibrations  
  • Hesitation or stalling 
  • Cleaning the distributor cap and rotor can help or resolve driveability issues temporarily, but the mentioned issues will return shortly.

    Once this issue is diagnosed, the ignition distributor shaft seal must be replaced, and the distributor shaft bearing must be inspected.

    If the brake pedal feels hard the first time it is pressed in the morning, it could be due to a problem with the vacuum supply hose for the brake booster. A revised brake booster hose is available to address this concern.

    The ABS modulator (hydraulic unit) can leak air into the brake system and cause a low brake pedal. A new ABS modulator will be needed if it is diagnosed to be the source of the leak.

    The computer can misinterpret a low battery voltage and can cause a false Check Engine (MIL) light to come on. Updating the PCM can correct this issue.

    Issues with the air fuel sensor (oxygen sensor) can set a Check Engine Light.  A failed sensor will need to be replaced for this repair.

     

    Front compliance (lower control arm ) bushings tend to crack and break requiring replacement.

    The distributors on higher mileage vehicles can leak oil onto the heater hose causing the hose to soften and break. Heater hose breakage will cause a coolant leak.

    A long cranking time before the engine starts might require a PCM software update and replacement of the fuel pressure regulator.

    The AC condenser failed due to contact with road debris and a lack of protection for the condenser.