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Honda Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 21 Honda models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

The 1998-2016 Honda Accord may develop issues with the automatic transmission.

Rough shifting may occur, and the “D4” light and check engine may begin to blink. The check engine light will also illuminate, and OBD trouble codes P0700, P0730, P0740, P0780, P1768 and/or P1768 will be stored in the computer.

If the transmission shifts roughly, the failure is very likely mechanical failure of the transmission. If the transmission performs normally, a faulty sensor, or dirty transmission fluid may be the case.

In most cases, it is necessary to use professional diagnostic equipment to provide a diagnosis, and complete the repair.

The longevity of the transmission is dependent on strict adherence to the manufacturer's recommendation for ATF replacement intervals and procedure.

On Certain models a faulty power window switch can cause the power windows to work or not work intermittently.

Some vehicles with an automatic transmission can have an issue with a harsh shift from first to second gear. Honda has released a service bulletin suggesting to flush the transmission using Honda ATF-Z1 and replace the linear solenoid. If that does not cure the problem the fault is internal and the transmission will require replacement or overhaul.

An overheated wire in the head light harness can cause the low beams not to work. Replacing combination light/turn signal switch switch, the wire for the low beams, and the combination switch connector (if damaged) should repair this issue.

The shift control solenoid externally mounted on the automatic transmission (non CVT) can fail and causes a harsh 1-2 shift. Replacing the shift solenoid and flushing the transmission with genuine Honda automatic transmission fluid may eliminate harsh shifting characteristics. A broken internal spring can cause the same issue. If the shift control solenoid does not repair the problem, the transmission will have to be replaced. 

The 1990-2001 Honda Civic has a known issue with ignition distributor shaft bearing failure, which causes:

  • Failure to start 
  • Engine randomly misfires 
  • Check Engine Light Illumination
  • OBD Trouble code(s) P0300, P0301, P0302, P0303, P0304, P1336, P1337 
  • Engine vibrations  
  • Hesitation or stalling 
  • Oil leak from distributor cap 
  • The ignition system uses the distributor to send high voltage electricity to the spark plugs at the right time. It accomplishes this timing mechanically by a shaft, which connects the crankshaft and ignition distributor, so they spin at the same rate. That shaft, part of the distributor, rests in a bearing inside the distributor.This bearing, the distributor shaft bearing, is known for failing, and allowing the shaft to move slightly.

    As the bearing fails, it allows the shaft to move away from the shaft seal, and oil pours into the distributor cap, causing misfires.

    The play in the shaft can also cause contact with the crankshaft position sensor, causing a no start problem.

    Total bearing failure will be most evident from the grinding noise that changes with engine speed, and oil in the ignition distributor cap.

    If the bearing is making noise, driving or running the vehicle can result in catastrophic engine failure.

    To correct this issue, the ignition distributor and shaft must be replaced. Any damage to the crankshaft position sensor will necessitate replacement as well.

     

    Front compliance (lower control arm ) bushings tend to crack and break requiring replacement.

    A sticking intake manifold runner solenoid can cause the Check Engine light (MIL) to illuminate. Replacing the solenoid will repair the issue.

    On some models a faulty wire harness for the seat belts can cause the SRS light to illuminate. Replacing the faulty wire harness should correct this issue.

    A rough idle and harsh transmission shift can be caused by a broken front engine mount. Replacing the broken mount will address these issues.

    A faulty computer in the Supplemental Restraint System (SRS) can cause a false "Side Airbag Off" light to illuminate. The SRS computer will need to be replaced for this issue.

    The air/fuel sensor, located in the exhaust system, may be damaged by moisture in the exhaust resulting in illumination of the Check Engine Light. Replacing the damaged air/fuel sensor and updating the powertrain control module (PCM) software should correct this concern.

    Leaking gaskets around the tail lights can allow water entry into the tail light assembly. New gaskets should fix this concern.