Ford Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Ford as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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514
Known Problems

An engine knocking noise coming from the lower end during acceleration is common and could be caused by worn or damaged engine bearings.

The tachometer sensor may fail; if the tachometer needle jumps around and the transmission has harsh shifts or does not upshift, this sensor should be checked. This sensor is mounted in a cover at the front of the motor.

Ignition module failure is common and causes a "No start" condition or intermittent stalls.

Hard driving conditions, including quick starts from a stop and hard acceleration up hills, can cause the rear motor mount to crack. The broken motor mount needs to be replaced, otherwise damage to the hybrid drive system may result.


Engine misfire could be caused by worn or broken motor mounts that raise the motor on one side while the vehicle is accelerating. The stress on the engine control wiring harness can cause breaks in the injector or sensor wires, which then causes drivability concerns such as poor fuel economy and engine misfires.

Bad motor mounts can cause the motor to move excessively, which pulls on the MAP sensor vacumn hose every time you step on the gas pedal. This either weakens the hose so it collapses (causing low vacuum flow) or pulls the vacuum hose that connects the intake manifold to the MAP sensor completely off of the sensor. When the hose is disconnected from the MAP sensor, a full rich condition will result.

The turbo hose could blow off of the turbo, causing a no boost condition.
The VGT solenoid may fail.
Hard starts, long crank time before the start, rough idle, and loss of power can be caused by using the wrong type of oil in this motor. With the engine off, remove the oil dipstick and inspect. If tiny bubbles are present, then the oil is foaming and unable to maintain proper operating pressure in the high pressure oil system.
Transmission wear is common. Pieces of broken components are often discovered in the transmission oil pan when the transmission is serviced.
The VGT solenoid can fail. The VGT solenoid receives signals from the engine control module to adjust the boost that the (variable geometry) turbo is generating. A defective solenoid can also create an overboost or underboost condition when driving.

Automatic transmission failure is higher than normal in this model. Small metal pieces may be found at the bottom of the transmission oil pan when the transmission is serviced.

The engine is prone to lower engine bearing failure from running the engine at high revolutions. Lack of regular, frequent engine service is also a factor in the failure.
Failure is very common in the ignition module, causing intermittent stalling or a "No start" condition.
A lack of power may occur if the turbo sticks.