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Ford Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 50 Ford models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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541
Known Problems

A cosmetic crack may develop on the plastic liftgate trim panel. Ford has released a service procedure to replace the applique without damage the the liftgate glass.

The common problem for ignition misfires are ignition coils going bad. Replacement of the bad ignition coil is necessary. These should be fixed as soon as a problem is detected. Otherwise the misfire can cause damage to other components.

Intermittent rough idle may be caused by the EGR sensor sticking, causing the EGR valve to stay slightly open. Our technicians tell us the valve and sensor must be replaced together to correct this concern.

Bulletin 13N02 - This program extends the coverage of the brake booster to ten years of service or 150,000 miles from the warranty start of the vehicle, whichever occurs first. This is a one time repair program.

In some of the affected vehicles, it is possible for the brake booster to develop a small tear in the diaphragm under certain driving and environmental conditions. If this occurs, the driver may hear a hissing noise while depressing the pedal and may also experience a "spongy" pedal feel without a noticeable effect on braking performance. If the vehicle is not serviced, the tear will eventually expand and the pedal effort required to stop the vehicle will gradually increase. However, in all cases, the fundamental vehicle braking system remains functional.

Wear on the rear axle shafts near the bearings can create excessive play and lead to gear oil leaking past the seals. Gear oil will leak onto the brake backing plate, brakes, and wheels.

The lug nuts on the Ford Fusion are known to swell to greater than their original size. When these lug nuts swell, the lug nut wrench will no longer fit, so they must be drilled or extracted. 

The lug nuts swell when they have been tightened too tight. To prevent this condition, only tighten the lug nuts with a torque wrench. If changing a flat on the road, the lugs should be loosened and tightened to specification at the earliest opportunity. 

A coolant leak from the radiator can be caused by a defective thermostat bypass. This can cause pressure spikes in the cooling system, which leads to radiator failure. The thermostat assembly and radiator should be replaced.

The high pressure diesel fuel injection pump may fail, resulting in a "no start" condition.

The automatic transmission may develop shifting concerns. On lower mileage vehicles, upgrading the software in the powertrain control module (PCM) and the transmission control module (TCM) may correct the problem. As the mileage increases, internal transmission damage can occur. Repairs could involve replacement of the valve body or a complete transmission rebuild. Whenever major transmission repairs are made, it is important to be sure the PCM and the TCM have the latest software updates to help prevent these issues from reoccurring.

The composite (plastic) intake manifold may crack near the thermostat housing and cause a coolant leak. Ford released an updated manifold that was reinforced to prevent a recurrence. No recall was issued for this problem but Ford did extend the warranty to seven years on some models from the date of purchase.

A failed heater blend door or actuator can cause the temperature control for the HVAC system to stop working. A clicking sound from the dash area would commonly indicate an actuator fault. If the heater gets stuck on the hottest setting, the heater blend door may be broken requiring replacement of the heater box to repair the issue.