Close

Ford Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 50 Ford models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

No car image 94a1663db56199c5353592009e34aaa51078a2469bed068bb8d6f0ba43accf97
Get a Repair Estimate
Guaranteed by certified locations nationwide. Learn more
RepairPal estimates are guaranteed at over 1,700 quality certified locations nationwide. Learn more
541
Known Problems

The composite (plastic) intake manifold may crack near the thermostat housing and cause a coolant leak. Ford released an updated manifold that was reinforced to prevent a recurrence. No recall was issued for this problem but Ford did extend the warranty to seven years on some models from the date of purchase.

A knocking noise from the upper engine area may indicate a loose intake runner. Our technicians tell us if this is the case, replacement of the upper intake clamshell will be necessary.

There are reports of failures of the CCRM or Constant Control Relay Module.  The CCRM has relays and switches inside that control or provide power to the engine cooling fan, AC clutch (to engage the AC compressor), fuel pump and powertrain control module (PCM).  Single switches or relays can fail internally causing a number of different symptoms including no start conditions (inoperative fuel pump or PCM), engine running warm due to inoperative cooling fan, or the AC might not blow cold air.

There is a technical service bulletin for the V8 engines regarding a possible problem with the spark plug being ejected from the cylinder head, damaging the threads in the spark plug hole. If the vehicle is under warranty, cylinder head replacement is recommended. If the vehicle is out of warranty, Ford authorized the use of a specific thread insert to repair the head.

The lug nuts on the Ford Fusion are known to swell to greater than their original size. When these lug nuts swell, the lug nut wrench will no longer fit, so they must be drilled or extracted. 

The lug nuts swell when they have been tightened too tight. To prevent this condition, only tighten the lug nuts with a torque wrench. If changing a flat on the road, the lugs should be loosened and tightened to specification at the earliest opportunity. 

The Check Engine Light may illuminate with code P0442, P0456, and/or P1450. These codes are related to the EVAP system. Our technicians tell us that if no EVAP system faults are confirmed, updated software is available for the powertrain control module (PCM) which should correct this concern.

Squeaks and creaks heard while driving over bumps and turning can be caused be a couple common sources and should be carefully diagnosed. Possible weld issues on the lower control arms can cause the noise concerns and require repair kits for the lower control arms from Ford. A jounce bumper (bump stop) rubbing against dry strut plate can cause an abrasion noise from the strut area. In this case the strut assembly should be disassembled to lubricate the jounce bumper and then reinstalled.

An abnormal noise may develop from the transfer case. At this time parts are not available to repair internal damage to this type of transfer case, replacement is the only option. It is not uncommon for irregular tire wear to cause a similar noise. Diagnoses should be performed to confirm the actual cause of the driveline noise. Tire noise can be reduced by rotating the tires at least every 5000 miles.

The engine may misfire and/or buck while driving at freeway speeds with no fault code stored in the powertrain control module (PCM). This can be caused by an intermittent fault with the camshaft synchronizer assembly. This condition can be diagnosed by monitoring knock sensor data as per Ford service bulletin #05-22-12. Replacement of the synchronizer assembly will be required to correct this concern.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate with code P0400 stored for an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) fault. Our technicians tell us if no EGR system faults are noted, updated powertrain control module (PCM) is available which should correct this issue.

The mass air flow sensor (MAF) may fail resulting in a rough engine idle, hesitation on acceleration, and/or engine stalling. The Check Engine Light may or may not illuminate. A failed mass air flow sensor will require replacement.

The automatic transmission may develop shifting concerns. On lower mileage vehicles, upgrading the software in the powertrain control module (PCM) and the transmission control module (TCM) may correct the problem. As the mileage increases, internal transmission damage can occur. Repairs could involve replacement of the valve body or a complete transmission rebuild. Whenever major transmission repairs are made, it is important to be sure the PCM and the TCM have the latest software updates to help prevent these issues from reoccurring.